Patients in Jersey receive medical cannabis from ALL physicians

Patients in Jersey receive medical cannabis from ALL physicians

Jersey will be the first place in the British Isles to allow all doctors to prescribe medical cannabis.

The politicians on the island have voted for every doctor to prescribe cannabis-based medicines, while in the UK only professionals are allowed.

A neurologist has now urged mainland Britain to follow suit, arguing that the current rules "limit the pool of experts" among medical professionals who are allowed to distribute the drug.

Cannabis-based drugs may be available to people on the Channel Island in northwestern France from February.

Cannabis-based medicines will be available to all doctors in Jersey starting in February, while mainland UK will only allow specialists to prescribe the medicines since they were legal last week

Cannabis-based medicines will be available to all doctors in Jersey starting in February, while mainland UK will only allow specialists to prescribe the medicines since they were legal last week

Cannabis-based medicines will be available to all doctors in Jersey starting in February, while mainland UK will only allow specialists to prescribe the medicines since they were legal last week

A member of the Jersey government, Montfort Tadier successfully launched his cannabis drug plan yesterday.

It was in favor of all doctors, including general practitioners, to prescribe cannabis derivatives, single ingredients such as cannabidiol (CBD) and pharmaceutical drugs based on parts of the marijuana plant.

The government's Health Minister will submit the plans on time to make the products available by February 28, the BBC reports.

This move will not change the law on smoking cannabis or resin – any cultivation, trade in or use of street cannabis remains illegal.

Professor Mike Barnes, a UK neurologist who had used one of his government reports on a change in his drug laws, said he was concerned about Britain's general attitude.

He added that the mainland should do the same as Jersey.

IF MEDICAL CANNABIS IS LEGAL?

Medicinal cannabis is available on prescription in the United Kingdom since November 1, 2018, after being approved by the government in July.

Interior Minister Sajid Javid said in summer: "Following the advice of two independent consultants, I have decided to reschedule cannabis medicines – which means they are available by prescription.

"This will help patients with exceptional clinical needs."

Mr. Javid added that "it is by no means a first step towards legalizing cannabis for recreational use."

Following a spectacular public pressure on the government to reduce seizures in epileptic children, the law has been changed to allow cannabis-based drugs to be prescribed to treat them.

The possession of the Class B drug continues to be punished with an unlimited fine and up to five years in prison, while traders face 14 years imprisonment.

"I see no logic in limiting prescriptions to hospital counselors, which limits the pool of expertise, especially in Jersey," said Professor Barnes.

"It's cannabis expertise that's needed, and not disease-specific expertise."

Professor Barnes, former president of the British Society of Rehabilitation Medicine and founder of the MS Trust charity, says cannabis expertise is rare among physicians.

Doctors may only prescribe cannabis products that have been pre-approved by the health service, but they are given greater power than before.

Certain cannabis-based medicines have been prescriptive for years when patients meet the right criteria.

One example is Sativex, an oral spray that relieves muscle stiffness and pain in patients with multiple sclerosis.

However, Mr Tadier said the patients needed to be "long and exhausting" to get the drug.

Specialists across the UK are now legally able to prescribe other medications such as Epidiolex – an epilepsy medicine for children – and nabilone – to treat vomiting in chemotherapy patients.

It is not clear which medications are approved for prescription drugs. The National Institute for Health & Care Excellence was commissioned to clarify the guidelines.

After the debate, in which other MPs voted in favor of his plans, Mr Tadier said: "We seem to have a United States Assembly that is relatively open.

"This is a positive move for the island and means we are leading the way in this area in the British Isles."

Montfort Tadier, a member of the Jersey government, has successfully passed an application that should allow physicians to prescribe medicinal cannabis products

Montfort Tadier, a member of the Jersey government, has successfully passed an application that should allow physicians to prescribe medicinal cannabis products

Montfort Tadier, a member of the Jersey government, has successfully passed an application that should allow physicians to prescribe medicinal cannabis products

The island's Health Minister, Deputy Richard Renouf, rejected the amendment and said the government should "carefully and gradually" take "cannabis," but it was overruled.

When medical cannabis was legalized, British Interior Minister Sajid Javid said it would be tightly controlled to prevent abuse.

Prescriptions can only be made by doctors in a specialist register of the General Practice Council.

Clark French of the United Patients Alliance said that specialists are likely to be inundated with requests for cannabis products.

He hopes that the law will be expanded to allow the prescription of family doctors.

Blair Gibbs, head of policy at the Center for Medicinal Cannabis, said, "This has developed incredibly quickly – possibly leading to one of the biggest changes in prescription drugs overnight.

"It was a bold decision to start with, but with increasing research and understanding, the decision to expand access and availability of cannabis-based drugs is becoming less difficult."

He added that the CMC is putting together policy proposals for the use of medical cannabis in the UK, which will be published in the coming weeks.

THE LANDMARK CASE OF BILLY CALDWELL, WHICH REQUESTS THE GOVERNMENT TO CHANGE ITS POSITION ON CANNABIS MEDICINES

Billy Caldwell's mother, Charlotte (pictured), confiscated seven bottles of cannabis oil from customs at Heathrow Airport, leading to a dispute over cannabis oil

Billy Caldwell's mother, Charlotte (pictured), confiscated seven bottles of cannabis oil from customs at Heathrow Airport, leading to a dispute over cannabis oil

Billy Caldwell's mother, Charlotte (pictured), confiscated seven bottles of cannabis oil from customs at Heathrow Airport, leading to a dispute over cannabis oil

Cannabis oil was brought into the limelight when son of epileptic boy Billy Caldwell had seven bottles confiscated at Heathrow airport customs.

The 12-year-old sparked a dispute over the medical status of the oil, causing the Home Office to step in and grant his mother Charlotte an emergency license for the product, which calmed his seizures that contained THC.

Billy's bottles were confiscated on June 11 after Ms. Caldwell brought her in from Toronto.

Behind the cases of Billy and his epileptic colleague Alfie Dingley, Six, Interior Minister Sajid Javid demanded a review of medical cannabis.

In July, he announced that some products containing the drug could be prescribed by prescription in the fall.

Due to today's amendment, Ms Caldwell said she was crying for joy.

"For me, a trip that was about the needs of my little boy became something that turned out to be something much bigger," she told Sky News.

"It turned out to be the needs of a nation.

"Medicinal cannabis gave me back my right as a mom to hope, but the most important thing medical cannabis has done is that Billy gets back his right to life.

"It took us a relatively short time to really see how many small children and people of all ages have been affected by the difficulties associated with access to medical cannabis.

"However, it became clear that it was not just about what was perceived as a small number of very sick children, and that medical cannabis could make a life-changing or life-saving difference for more than one million people."

Although enthusiastic about the change, Caldwell hopes the regulations will be expanded to allow more people to benefit from cannabis-based treatments.

"This is new territory for everyone. We have done in a few days what the UK governments have not done for more than half a century and made medical cannabis legal, "she said.

"Then as then, politicians did not recognize the complexity.

"There are a variety of diseases, each of which can only be treated by certain forms of medical cannabis."

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