Pepperdine students protected on the spot as wildfire raged around Malibu

Susan Svrluga Grade Point Blog Higher Education reporter November 10, 2:57 pm Pepperdine University's 3,600 students were called to safety on Friday when wildfire was closed on Malibu campus. The Woolsey fire has forced evacuations, but the Pepperdine students have been asked to camp in one of the two buildings on the campus – a decision that scared some parents and students, even though the university had assured themselves that they were advising the fire department has been. [Wildfires leave trail of death, destruction in California] Shortly after midnight local time on Saturday morning, the university alerted the campus about flames on the slopes. "Pepperdine's protocols for protection remain in place. Several LA County firefighters and Luftwaffe fire departments are attacking the fire from the campus. "Just before 2 am, the school said," The Los Angeles County Fire Department and the Air Force are working to stem the flames on and around the Malibu campus. There are no permanent structures lost. "A few minutes after 8 o'clock the university picked up the order in the accommodation. "The flames on the hills near the campus were erased early in the morning," the university officials said, "although fires may be reported that should be reported to public safety." All classes have been canceled. Overnight a debate raged over whether the students were in the safest place – or caught. Can you explain to me how safe they are? My son is here and I'm worried – Nicole Elsea (@NicoleElsea) November 10, 2018 On Twitter, someone else wrote, "This is a real risk that #Pepperdine has made" so as not to evict thousands of students. The students are currently inhaling toxic amounts of smoke and ashes. I can only hope that the hard work of the fire brigade can correct the bad judgment of the school. – Daniel Grogan (@ DanielGrogan19) November 10, 2018 Some students left the campus despite the arrangement of the accommodations. And many people reassured worried parents and students that the campus was well prepared for this type of threat, with huge water tanks and students sheltered from the burning chaparral or scrubland. Please stop frightening our students and evacuating them. #Pepperdine is the safest place, even if the fire is on campus. We have already gone through it once. Follow the instructions of AKB.- Kim Wong (@TheKWongWay) November 10, 2018 I feel like everyone thinks that all the pepp kids are so freaked out about the fire, but they like it. Even the novice sits here playing card games or sleeping. we are chilling We are good out here. we are fine.- nat ™ (@natalxerosis) November 10, 2018 It seems uninteresting, said Connie Horton, vice president of student affairs, but Los Angeles County Fire Department supports the Shelter-in-Place plan as the safest course. "We have lived, practiced, practiced and trained several times over the years." The university has been following the same procedure since 1993, according to a social media release by the school president. Campus buildings are constructed of refractory materials, as the University's website explains. School roads provide a fire break and the brush is removed up to 200 feet or more each year from buildings. With a limited number of off-campus and off-campus roads, roads can quickly become clogged and dangerous as forest fires shift unpredictably. Horton said on Friday it was confusing for parents and students if evacuation orders were issued in the community so that several people made phone calls to reassure families. She watched the "migration" to the shelters, where the students were holding pillows and bags, looking for a place to settle down. "She changes from a moment of fear to a party in her sleep. They hang out, take a nap and go to their books. " [‘It was a view of hell’: The wildfire raging in California was named after their small college — it started that close] That was before the fire. The fire on campus continues to burn and the fire department continues to hit back. The helicopter operation is very effective and impressive. Hoping for the best of the night. Power just went out again. Andrew K. Benton (@PresidentBenton) November 10, 2018 The Los Angeles Times reported that the firefighters "fought a night to save Pepperdine" and that the fierce attack from the air and on the ground seemed to have prevented more damage. A spokesman for Cal Fire said Saturday he could not confirm what happened overnight on campus. A spokeswoman for the university and student government officials did not respond immediately to comments on Saturday. It was an emotional and exhausting series of days for the private Christian university: on Wednesday night, people in Pepperdine tried to find students who were in the Borderline Bar and Grill near Thousand Oaks when a gunman opened fire and killed 12. On Thursday, they gathered to mourn Alaina Housley, an 18-year-old freshman who was one of the victims of the shootout. And then the fire joined. [The 12 lives lost in the Thousand Oaks shooting] Pepperdine University Graphic, the student newspaper, said, "Many students have left the campus, and those who remain claim that it has been a really tough 48 hours. On Saturday night, Pepperdine's President Andrew Benton was able to calm the campus: everyone was safe. By extinguishing the flames on campus, everyone on campus is safe and unhurt. I am deeply grateful for the speedy work of LAFD, LASD and our student support teams, as well as for the patience and cooperation of our incredible community. The prayer is good too. – Andrew K. Benton (@PresidentBenton) November 10, 2018

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