PM stands before the Cabinet after Ireland's refusal to allow Britain's unilateral withdrawal

PM stands before the Cabinet after Ireland's refusal to allow Britain's unilateral withdrawal

Theresa May stands in front of her cabinet after Dublin insisted that it would not accept a unilateral British ability to end a Brexit backstop deal at the Irish border.

Tuesday's meeting of high-level ministers took place after Justice Minister David Gauke said a no-deal EU exit was "very bad" for the UK economy.

It is understood that Ms. May is seeking an opt-out to curb Tory's and DUP's concerns that the entire UK should remain temporarily in a customs union with the EU after Brexit in order to set a hard border in Ireland avoid.

The hard talk from Ireland came when Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell confirmed that Labor would not support a temporary customs union with the EU.

If we leave without agreement, there is no reason to fight back, it will be very bad for us financially
Justice Minister David Gauke

Asked if Labor would vote against a customs union option if it were not permanent, McDonnell told BBC2 Newsnight, "Yes, I think so, because … we'll see what it brings and we'll get along with people Be honest, if it does not protect the jobs and the economy, we can not support it.

"All the messages we receive over this period are that our European partners absolutely want what we want – a business that protects their jobs and their economy in the same way we want it.

"So we believe that there is a deal if they realize that the deal is unacceptable to Parliament, and I think that will give us a glimpse of the possibilities of real negotiations."

Mr Gauke commented on a Channel 4 Brexit debate: "If we do not leave under any circumstances, there is no good thing to scare off, it will be very bad for us financially.

"If we can do a good business, we have to eliminate all friction …. The Checkers type deal, as I say, if we do not have friction with trading, then I do not think economically that will make a big difference. "

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Justice Minister David Gauke in the Brexit debate in Channel 4 (Aaron Chown / PA)

Amid reports that Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab and other Cabinet Brexiters urged Britain to stop with a few months' notice, there was better news for the PM as the EU agreed to offer London a compromise on Irish Question.

Brussels could propose an "independent mechanism" that, according to the Times, Britain could end a temporary tariff agreement with the EU.

After speculating for days on an Irish border issues deal, Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar phoned Ms. May on Monday to deny her call for an agreement with a back-stop mechanism, which is not a hard line in Ireland. if the UK and the EU do not make a more comprehensive trade agreement.

However, Mr Varadkar's spokesman said that the Irish Prime Minister said he was ready to consider proposals for a review mechanism, but only if it was clear that the agreement could not be unilaterally lifted by both sides.

The backstop problem has become the main obstacle to reaching an agreement on Britain's exit from the European Union on 29 March 2019.

In a survey of 20,000 people for Channel 4, Remain would win another in / out referendum by 54% -46%.

Using a "multi-level" modeling methodology, the broadcaster said that 105 community districts that voted for "leave" in 2016 are now carried by the remaining party.

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