Police officers were asked to hear their views on spit guards

Police officers were asked to hear their views on spit guards

Officials of the Metropolitan Police should be clarified whether they want to wear a pike watch.

In a survey by the Metropolitan Police Federation, members are asked if they've ever been spit or bitten during their service in the last two years – and if they want a guard for protection.

Scotland Yard boss Cressida Dick has previously said that with Spit guards on the streets, police officers may be more likely to get "kicked".

The mesh hoods are used about three times a week in the detention rooms of the Metropolitan Police, but not on the met officers on the beat, unlike those of the British transport police patrolling London.

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Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick (Victoria Jones / PA)

Ken Marsh, chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, said officers "deserve as much protection as we can give them".

He added, "It's absolutely horrible to get spit on, my colleagues … do not deserve to go to work and get attacked in this way.

"Anecdotally, we know that officers are spit up far too often – but we need to be able to bring the evidence to the Commissioner's office.

"We've already publicly asked our colleagues to report every time they're spit on, and this poll is the next step."

The association said details about the dangers and frequency of spitting attacks would help persuade Ms. Dick to expose her to the supply belts of all police officers in London.

It's absolutely horrible to be spit on
Ken Marsh, chairman of the Met Police Federation

Speaking at the London Assembly's Police and Crime Committee last week, Ms. Dick said she had decided to use a guard in a custody suite, where several officers and supervisors are present.

She said, "Those of you who have real concerns about the Guardian would say if you put it on someone's head, it's potentially very scary and makes someone very claustrophobic.

"It gives those who use it the impression that this is a distressing thing."

The guards deployed by 37 forces in England and Wales have been criticized by human rights groups, including Amnesty International, whom they described as "a cruel and dangerous form of restraint."

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