Saudi Arabia releases Prince Khaled bin Talal after months in jail

Saudi Arabia releases Prince Khaled bin Talal after months in jail

The Ritz Carlton in Riyadh on February 11thimage rights
AFP / Getty

image Description

Princes and other senior figures were detained last year for corruption allegations at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Riyadh

According to reports, a Saudi prince arrested for criticizing a crackdown on corruption was released from custody.

Relatives of Prince Khaled bin Talal shared social media pictures that were allegedly received this weekend, showing the Prince who welcomed his family.

The prince, who was held for almost a year, is a nephew of King Salman.

Prince Khaled's brother, Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, was among dozens of princes and other senior figures held in a corruption operation late last year.

The latest move is under heavy pressure from Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman over the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Analysts say the Saudi authorities seem to defuse the crisis by strengthening the support of the royal family.

"Thank God for your safety," tweeted Prince Khaled's niece, Princess Reem bint Alwaleed, and posted pictures of him with other family members.

Other pictures of relatives showed how the prince kissed and hugged his son, who has been in a coma for several years.

The Saudi government has not made any official statements regarding his imprisonment or apparent release.

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media labelingSaudi billionaire Prince Alwaleed bin Talal gives a tour of the luxury prison

However, the Wall Street Journal reported that he was detained for eleven months for criticizing the mass arrests of more than 200 princes, ministers and business people over the past year on corruption charges.

They were detained in hotels in Riyadh, including the five-star Ritz-Carlton.

Analysts suggest the operation was an attempt by the Crown Prince to consolidate power.

At the end of January, the Saudi Attorney General's Office said that more than $ 100 billion (£ 77 billion) had been confiscated on financial parole with the detainees.

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