Scientists are always finding new ways how energy drinks are terrible for you

Scientists are always finding new ways how energy drinks are terrible for you

Energy drinks are technically not "food". This is not just a waste – it's just a fact and an important fact.

The Food & Drug Administration regulates all food-defined products to ensure that they are safe for human consumption. For example, coffee drinks and soda should not contain too much caffeine, otherwise they cause heart problems. However, energy drinks are considered supplements, which means they are unregulated. Manufacturers can put as much caffeine in a can as they want. You can even mix caffeine with other stimulants so that cardiovascular or nervous system problems can occur.

Therefore, doctors have been trying to investigate what health effects these caffeinated cocktails might have. A new study showing that a single drink can decrease the function of the blood vessels is making headlines, but similar findings have been known for years. The latest results will be presented at the annual American Heart Association meeting. In 2015, Mayo Clinic researchers presented a study at the AHA Scientific Meetings showing that a single drink increases blood pressure and cortisol levels (a measure of stress).

Much of the concern about these drinks comes from the high levels of stimulants. An overdose of caffeine alone is quite possible (although 5 to 10 grams of the material may be needed, which could contain more coffee than the stomach). In combination with guarana, another stimulant, lower levels can have drastic effects.

But it probably comes down to the basics most of the time. The World Health Organization has published a meta-analysis of energy drink studies stating that "the health risks associated with consuming energy drinks are largely related to their caffeine content." An overdose of caffeine does not necessarily result death, but may cause palpitations, nausea, vomiting, convulsions, metabolic acidosis and high blood pressure. And it can kill you. The WHO study also reports that adults who consume energy drinks may increase their risk of high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes (caffeine reduces insulin sensitivity).

You may be wondering why we do not see all the risks associated with coffee consumption. Depending on the variety, coffee drinks may contain as much caffeine as certain energy drinks, although many energy drinks contain caffeine as a cup of coffee several times. The problem, according to the WHO, has more to do with the speed with which the drink is run down: "Although some coffees may have a caffeine content comparable to energy drinks, coffee is normally consumed hot and consequently slower." They are likely to chug you Not your morning coffee, even if it's a frozen latte, but you can in a few minutes consume a whole can of chilled energy drinks. This sudden caffeine spike could trigger a heart attack even if the total dose equals that of a cold cup of cold cup.

Here in the US, we are not following any adverse events that are specifically related to energy drinks – they are all collected only from caffeine-related events. But some countries do it. Germany's tracking system suggests that since 2002 energy drinks have caused "liver damage, kidney failure, respiratory disorders, arousal, seizures, psychotic conditions, rhabdomyolysis, tachycardia, cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, heart failure and death." Ireland and New Zealand Every 15 to 20 years, approximately 15 to 20 serious complications from the consumption of energy drinks were noted during each period (Ireland from 1999 to 2005, New Zealand from 2005 to 2009).

For this reason, several countries have tried to completely remove energy drinks. France even managed to ban them for a short time, but the companies filed a petition with the European Commission arguing that there are none proof that her drinks were actively unsafe. The ban was lifted shortly thereafter. Some federal states have successfully banned Red Bull Cola after a small amount of cocaine was found in the drink in 2008. Red Bull claimed that all active cocaine was taken from the coca plant in which the drinks were used, but the German prohibitions were in place. In Australia, Denmark, Uruguay and Turkey there is a ban on caffeinated beverages.

However, in countries like the US, energy drinks are sold everywhere and are actively marketed to children and adolescents. A review of the health effects in the journal in 2011 pediatrics pointed out that young people may be particularly vulnerable, as safe consumption has not been established and they may have discovered heart or metabolic problems that can aggravate energy drinks, not to mention that they contain tons of sugar.

Despite the WHO's recommendation to limit the caffeine content per beverage, US energy drinks are still completely unregulated and will remain so if they are not classified as food. In the meantime, you should probably stop drinking it. They can not be dangerous in small quantities, but none of them are healthy. Switch to coffee or tea. Both will cheer you up in the morning and will be much harder to exaggerate. Or you could just keep working and working to improve your caffeine habit for good.

Leave a comment

Send a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.