A vaccine against streptode cases? Scientists are discovering why the infection in children and new mothers is deadly – paving the way for a shot

  • The infection can develop into an invasive group A strep, which can be fatal
  • Strep A kills 500,000 people every year, especially children and young mothers
  • Experts warn that this is a growing problem as antibiotics become less effective
  • However, US scientists have discovered why it is developing – paving the way for a vaccine

Mia De Graaf Health Editor for Dailymail.com

A vaccine could be developed to prevent deadly complications from throat infections, scientists say, after discovering how the infection turns into a carnivorous disease.

Every year, more than 700 million people suffer from sore throat of group A streptococcal bacteria, which can be transmitted by sneezing, coughing, kissing and touching.

Mostly it clears up in a few days with a dose of antibiotics.

However, some – especially children and young mothers – may develop into an A-type invasion that moves from the neck to the muscles, lungs, and blood, devastating healthy tissue, killing 500,000 people a year.

Experts warn that this is an increasingly pressing concern as we move towards a future where antibiotics are less effective.

However, a new study has hoped to stem the fatal cases of Strep: Scientists used artificial intelligence to sift through the largest data set ever recorded for the Group A Strep genome, eventually mapping the complex structure of the bacteria ,

A group A Strep infection kills 500,000 people annually. Experts warn that this is a growing problem as antibiotics become less effective. However, American scientists have discovered how the bacteria develop - and pave the way for a vaccine

A group A Strep infection kills 500,000 people annually. Experts warn that this is a growing problem as antibiotics become less effective. However, American scientists have discovered how the bacteria develop - and pave the way for a vaccine

A group A Strep infection kills 500,000 people annually. Experts warn that this is a growing problem as antibiotics become less effective. However, American scientists have discovered how the bacteria develop – and pave the way for a vaccine

"We and others have been investigating this problem for over 100 years, and we still do not have an effective vaccine against Group A," said lead author Dr. James Musser from the Houston Methodist Hospital.

AI, however, allowed the team to "take a major step toward an effective vaccine to eradicate Streptop Group A from Earth."

He added, "One of the very unexpected and exciting things we discovered was a strategy that caused the Group A group to suffer serious human disease.

This new mechanism controls virulence and determines if the organism is just a pathogen or a really angry, carnivorous pathogen.

"This discovery would not have been possible if this unusually large data set was available for artificial intelligence analysis."

To do this, they studied the M28 strain of group A streptococci, which causes a variety of invasive cases and a high incidence of childhood bed fever.

In many countries, it is one of the five most common Strep strains of group A, leading to severe invasive diseases in humans.

He said, "From a numerical point of view, M28s are very important causes of human infections. Therefore, we wanted to gain new insights. As you begin to understand the molecular pathogenesis processes, you have the opportunity to develop potentially new therapeutics and diagnostics

"Now with these huge amounts of data, we can now analyze them much more extensively and with different eyes than we could in the past."

The strategy was adopted by the cancer research strategy.

"History teaches us the more we understand how cancer cells work, the better we can find new ways to prevent them from causing human disease.

"Until 20 years ago, we did not understand most of the genetic changes that cause cancer.

"We now understand them much more precisely because of the extensive research and analysis of cancer genes.

"With cancer, you can see that it will be very important not just to analyze one aspect, such as the genome of a cancer cell, but also to analyze which proteins are produced by the cancer cell and how precisely cancer invades that cell other areas of the body.

"We have clearly demonstrated new ways in which the M28 strain of group A-Strep causes infection, and it gives us a way to understand how this organism causes maternal sepsis.

"The extensive knowledge that we now have provides us with information about how to begin major downstream research, such as developing a vaccine or a new treatment to fight this organism and possibly eradicate it in the future. "

The study was published in the journal Nature Genetics.

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