Serena Williams: Jamie Murray says men do not get preferred treatment

Serena Williams: Jamie Murray says men do not get preferred treatment
Listen to Serena Williams & # 39; outbreak on the court

The Briton Jamie Murray has rejected allegations that men are treated by referees with more leniency than women.

Serena Williams was chained by Portuguese official Carlos Ramos for insulting her during her US Open final defeat against Naomi Osaka last week.

The American claimed she was "sexist" and her view was supported by former World Champion Billie-Jean King, who said there was a "double standard".

Murray said it was "a bit far-fetched" to say that men are treated differently.

Williams was eager to equal the record of Margaret Court of 24 Grand Slam titles and faced 20-year-old Osaka in Flushing Meadows in their first grand final.

The 36-year-old had already received a fine for smashing her racket and a code violation for coaching when she called Ramos a "thief" and a "liar" in New York.

On the eve of Britain's Davis Cup match against Uzbekistan in Glasgow, US Open mixed doubles champion Murray BBC Sport said: "I think the referee did what was in his rights.

"Coaching is common, many people do it, some people are not called in. Calling in a Grand Slam finale may have been a little short, but I think the response was quite over the top.

"I've seen a lot of people called for coaching before, and maybe you have a grumble and stuff, but you keep coming."

At the Davis Cup Ramos Croatia will be eliminated against the USA. US captain Jim Courier said before the poll to the AP news agency, "It's polarized and somewhat politicized, but we have no doubt that Carlos just enforced the rules as he sees them."

American player Steve Johnson added, "Look, I do not want this going in the wrong direction, but it has enforced rules that have been imposed on me over the years.

"I've never been called to practice, but the bat infestation, the insults, that's just part of the sport, I think much of it has perhaps been overrated because it was the final of the US Open."

The women supporting the WTA, Williams and CEO Steve Simon, said that the referee showed her a different level of tolerance for her outbursts than if she had been a man.

Meanwhile, the International Tennis Federation defended 47-year-old Ramos and said he had "acted with professionalism and integrity at all times".

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