Superbugs kill 33,000 people in Europe, TRIPLE the crowd ten years ago

Superbugs kill 33,000 people in Europe, TRIPLE the crowd ten years ago

According to health experts, around 33,000 people die of superbugs every year in Europe.

An analysis has shown that deaths from antibiotic-resistant infections have tripled in the last decade – from 11,000 in 2007.

Experts warn now, the burden of the population by Superbugs is similar to HIV, influenza and tuberculosis.

The European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), which conducted the study, described the results as "worrying".

Superbugs such as multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter (top) kill around 33,000 people every year in Europe, a three-fold increase since 2007

Superbugs such as multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter (top) kill around 33,000 people every year in Europe, a three-fold increase since 2007

The Swedish-based facility expressed its concern about the increase in the number of insects resistant to the strongest antibiotics of last resort, the so-called carbapenems.

"This … is worrisome because these antibiotics are the last available treatment options," the ECDC said in a statement.

"When these are no longer effective, it is extremely difficult or in many cases impossible to treat infections."

MEPs warned last month that superbugs would kill more people than cancer and diabetes by 2050, unless something is done against antibiotic resistance.

Experts say the world's death toll could reach tens of millions in the next 30 years worldwide.

Experts believe that around 70 percent of bacteria that can cause infection are already resistant to at least one antibiotic commonly used in their treatment.

This has made the superbugs of evolution one of the biggest threats to medicine.

WHAT IS ANTIBIOTIC STABILITY?

Antibiotics have been unnecessarily released by GPs and hospital staff for decades, turning once-harmless bacteria into super-bacteria.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has previously warned that if nothing is done, the world is heading for an era after the antibiotic.

It claimed that frequent infections such as chlamydia become killers without the growing crisis being resolved immediately.

Bacteria can become drug-resistant if people take wrong doses of antibiotics or are given unnecessary administration.

Chief physician Dame Sally Davies claimed in 2016 that the threat of antibiotic resistance is as great as terrorism.

Superbugs are estimated to kill 10 million people each year by 2050, with patients once succumbing to harmless bugs.

Every year, around 700,000 people already die from drug-resistant infections such as tuberculosis (TB), HIV and malaria all over the world.

There have been repeated concerns that medicines will be returned to the "dark age" if antibiotics become ineffective in the coming years.

In addition to reducing the efficacy of existing drugs, only one or two new antibiotics have been developed in the last 30 years.

In September, WHO warned that antibiotics were "phasing out" when a report found a "serious shortage" of new drugs in the development pipeline.

Without antibiotics, cesarean sections, cancer treatments and hip prostheses would be incredibly "risky", it was said.

The study, published in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases, focused on five types of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the European Union and in the European Economic Area (EU / EEA).

It has been discovered that around 75 percent of Superbugs are under contract in hospitals and health centers – known as health-related infections.

The researchers also looked at the differences between European countries, with Italy and France the highest death rates.

Britain took fifth place in the ranking with an estimated 2,170 deaths in 2015 and 53,000 cases. Infection rates were lower in northern European countries.

The results also showed that super-cranial infections are responsible for the loss of 900,000 years of health.

This is 170 years per 100,000 inhabitants, compared to the 183 per 100,000 people in the three main infectious diseases HIV, influenza and tuberculosis.

The study under the direction of dr. Alessandro Cassini showed that the deadliest supercrane, carbapenem-resistant K pneumoniae, had the largest growth – nearly seven times since 2007.

"Strategies to prevent and control antibiotic-resistant bacteria require coordination at EU / EEA level and at the global level," said the researchers.

They added that because of the different case numbers and types of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that cause infections in different countries, prevention and control measures need to be tailored to national circumstances.

The UK government wants to halve the number of unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions by 2020.

Every year, 700,000 people are dying from drug-resistant infections such as tuberculosis (TB), HIV and malaria all over the world

The World Health Organization (WHO) has previously warned that the world is heading for an era after the antibiotic.

In addition to reducing the efficacy of existing drugs, only two new antibiotics have been developed in the last 30 years.

Countries sorted by fatalities in 2015
country Deaths (estimated)
Italy 10800
France 5545
Germany 2370
Poland 2220
United Kingdom 2170
Spain 1890
Greece 1630
Romania 1470
Portugal 1160
Hungary 545
Belgium 530
Czech Republic 490
Slovakia 380
Austria 280
Bulgaria 280
Croatia 240
Ireland 220
Netherlands 200
Sweden 170
Denmark 125
Slovenia 100
Lithuania 90
Finland 90
Norway 70
Cyprus 65
Latvia 45
Malta 30
Luxembourg 20
Estonia fifteen
Iceland 1
total 33241
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