Home Health The 23-year-old paramedic suffers a stroke after she breaks her neck, mistaking...

The 23-year-old paramedic suffers a stroke after she breaks her neck, mistaking her own symptoms for drunkenness

A paramedic told her how she suffered a stroke when she reached down her neck and ruptured a large artery.

Natalie Kunicki, who works for the London Ambulance Service, even thought her own symptoms were drunk and was too embarrassed to call 999.

She watched movies with a friend in bed after one night last year when she reached out and heard a loud "cracking" but did not think much of it.

When Ms. Kunicki went to the bathroom 23, 15 minutes later, she collapsed on the floor when she could not move her left leg.

She was taken to a hospital where she was told that her vertebral artery – a major artery in the neck – had burst. This caused a blood clot to form in her brain and trigger a stroke.

Ms. Kunicki, who was living in West Hampstead at that time, was so shocked that she stayed "emotionless" for days.

She is now rebuilding her life and slowly regaining her mobility. The doctors do not know when and if they will ever fully recover.

Natalie Kunicki, who works for the London Ambulance Service, considered her own symptoms of stroke on March 4 as drunk and was initially too embarrassed to call 999

Natalie Kunicki, who works for the London Ambulance Service, considered her own symptoms of stroke on March 4 as drunk and was initially too embarrassed to call 999

Ms. Kunicki, pictured as a nurse in Australia during her apprenticeship, watched movies after a long night in bed with a friend as she reached out and heard a loud crack.

Ms. Kunicki, pictured as a nurse in Australia during her apprenticeship, watched movies after a long night in bed with a friend as she reached out and heard a loud crack.

The doctors confirmed that Ms. Kunicki's vertebral artery, a major artery in the neck, had burst, causing a blood clot in her brain and triggering a stroke. Shown in the hospital

The doctors confirmed that Ms. Kunicki's vertebral artery, a major artery in the neck, had burst, causing a blood clot in her brain and triggering a stroke. Shown in the hospital

Ms. Kunicki said, "People need to know that even when you are young, something so simple can cause a stroke.

"I did not even try to crack my neck. I just moved and it happened. I stretched my neck and I could just hear this "cracking, cracking, cracking".

"My friend asked" was that your throat? "but all my joints are tearing, so I did not think about it, just laughed.

"I got up and tried to go to the bathroom, and I swayed everywhere. I looked down and found that I did not move my left leg at all. Then I fell to the ground. & # 39;

She added, "My friend had to pick me up. He thought I was drunk, but I knew something else was wrong.

I thought I had been drugged. The date of the rape can lead to paralysis. & # 39;

Ms. Kunicki, who moved from Canberra, Australia to LAS in December 2017, admitted that she was reluctant to call 999 first because she did not want colleagues to show up and her & # 39; drunk & # 39; found.

She said, "I'm a paramedic and did not call 999 for ten minutes because I thought it was too unlikely that it would be a blow if I had known much better."

After she hardly wanted to fall asleep, Ms. Kunicki put aside her embarrassment and called the emergency services.

As soon as the rescue team began the tests, Ms. Kunicki realized that something serious was wrong, as her coordination deteriorated and her heart rate and blood pressure were sky high.

She said, "I tried to call 999, but I hesitated.

Ms. Kunicki is now rebuilding her life, but doctors are not sure when and if she will regain full mobility. She said she could not walk for more than 15 minutes. Pictured, walk in the hospital

Ms. Kunicki is now rebuilding her life, but doctors are not sure when and if she will regain full mobility. She said she could not walk for more than 15 minutes. Pictured, walk in the hospital

As soon as the rescue team began the tests, Ms. Kunicki realized that something serious was wrong, as her coordination deteriorated and her heart rate and blood pressure were sky high. Shown in the hospital

As soon as the rescue team began the tests, Ms. Kunicki realized that something serious was wrong, as her coordination deteriorated and her heart rate and blood pressure were sky high. Shown in the hospital

Ms. Kunicki, who moved from Canberra, Australia, to LAS in December 2017, said she was initially reluctant to call 999 because she did not want a crew she knew to be after her & # 39; drinker & # 39; 39; examined. Shown in front of the hospital with her roommate Emily Nawiesniak and her father Peter Kunicki

Ms. Kunicki, who moved from Canberra, Australia, to LAS in December 2017, said she was initially reluctant to call 999 because she did not want a crew she knew to be after her & # 39; drinker & # 39; 39; examined. Shown in front of the hospital with her roommate Emily Nawiesniak and her father Peter Kunicki

"I think they first looked at me like they thought I was just a drunken 23-year-old classic, but I told them I was a paramedic and I knew something was wrong."

After the tests, the rescue team rushed Ms. Kunicki to University College London Hospital, where it was confirmed that she had suffered a stroke and needed emergency surgery.

After undergoing blue light at the National Neurology and Neurosurgery Hospital, she was operated on for three hours where doctors discovered her uterine artery.

While surgeons were able to repair Ms. Kunicki's artery with a stent, they could not remove the clot in her brain, but they believe that it will dissolve over time.

Ms. Kunicki, whose left side was almost completely paralyzed by the stroke, said the diagnosis was such a shock that she became "emotionless" for days.

She said, "When the counselor told me that I had a stroke, I was shocked.

"The doctors later told me that only the stretching of my neck caused my vertebral artery to burst. It was just spontaneous and there is a million chance that it will happen.

"I do not smoke, I do not really drink and I have no family strokes. It's pretty strange that this happened to me while I was in bed.

"I was just shut down, trying to figure out what happened. People said I was a bit of a robot and did not show much emotion. & # 39;

Ms. Kunicki felt so weak that she told her adviser that they should have "killed her."

Ms. Kunicki said, "I was expecting to wake up from this Wunderkammer and everything would be fixed, but my mobility was worse and they could not cleanse the clot.

"At first I could not move my thumb and index finger. I could move my wrist up and down. I could not lift my arm. I could bend my left leg, but I could not move my toes.

Natalie underwent a three-hour operation, during which the doctors discovered her uterine artery. While surgeons were able to repair the artery of Natalie with a stent, they could not cleanse the clot in their brains, but they believe that it will dissolve over time. Afterwards imaged in the hospital

Natalie underwent a three-hour operation, during which the doctors discovered her uterine artery. While surgeons were able to repair the artery of Natalie with a stent, they could not cleanse the clot in their brains, but they believe that it will dissolve over time. Afterwards imaged in the hospital

Ms. Kunicki was so shocked that for days she was & # 39; unemotional & # 39; She has been living and resuming her life, but doctors are not sure when and if she will regain her full mobility. The hospital is recovering

Ms. Kunicki was so shocked that for days she was & # 39; unemotional & # 39; She has been living and resuming her life, but doctors are not sure when and if she will regain her full mobility. The hospital is recovering

Ms. Kunicki was so shocked that she had been diagnosed with a stroke so young that for days on end she remained "emotionless" and even told a nurse that she "should have killed her". Presented before her stroke - she enjoyed keeping fit and going to the gym

Ms. Kunicki was so shocked that she had been diagnosed with a stroke so young that for days on end she remained "emotionless" and even told a nurse that she "should have killed her". Presented before her stroke – she enjoyed keeping fit and going to the gym

"I think I scared my adviser, because when I woke up, she came to ask me how I was, but I told her," You should've killed me. "

"Depression is really common after a stroke because you lose so much independence and dignity."

Now she has regained movement and sensation, Ms. Kunicki is doing much better.

Daily exercises have helped her regain enough movement in the leg, arm and hand.

Doctors can not give a precise time frame for a full recovery, but Ms. Kunicki hopes she can return to "light duty" in six to twelve months.

She said, "I found movement on my left. But I can not walk for more than five minutes.

I'm really awkward. I can not do any buttons anymore, I find it too difficult. I can feel hot and cold now, but I still feel a bit numb.

"Doctors only say things like 'We hope for a full recovery' and do not give a precise time because they do not want to arouse my hopes.

"But I'm determined to get back to work as soon as I can. I just love it. & # 39;

In addition to her determination to return to work, Ms. Kunicki is committed to raising awareness of stroke among young people.

Ms. Kunicki was shocked even as a health professional when she found out how common strokes can be in adolescents and children.

Ms. Kunicki said she regularly broke her joints and did not think much about it when her throat made a cracking noise. Depicted, healthy and active before her stroke

Ms. Kunicki said she regularly broke her joints and did not think much about it when her throat made a cracking noise. Depicted, healthy and active before her stroke

Doctors can not give a precise time frame for a full recovery, but Ms. Kunicki hopes she can return to "light duty" in six to twelve months. She was flooded with support from friends and family (pictured with gifts in the hospital)

Doctors can not give a precise time frame for a full recovery, but Ms. Kunicki hopes she can return to "light duty" in six to twelve months. She was flooded with support from friends and family (pictured with gifts in the hospital)

Ms. Kennedy was forced to give up her home because she can not afford the rent and would like to return to work she says she loves. Shown before

Ms. Kennedy was forced to give up her home because she can not afford the rent and would like to return to work she says she loves. Shown before

She said, "I was called to so many people who had a stroke, and they are always in their 70s or 80s. I've never been to a young person who had a stroke.

My was one in a million, but a broken vertebral artery is a fairly common cause of stroke in young people.

"You'll be in the gym or doing something very physical and that happens. Strokes are also quite common in children. & # 39;

After her stroke, Ms. Kunicki had to give up her flat in West Hampstead because she can not afford the rent while she takes so much time off.

Ms. Kunicki has been living in Harrow, London with her parents, Peter Kunicki, 65, and Anne Kunicki, 62, since her release. In July, however, they should return to Australia.

Ms. Kunicki's brother Michael Kunicki, 33, has set up a donation page for her while she gets back on her feet.

Ms. Kunicki said, "Eighty percent of the donations come from people I work with, which means that. I really want to return to my own flat and really do not want to move back to Australia. I love my job too much and do not want to leave it. & # 39;

To donate to Ms. Kunicki's gofundme page, click here.

What is a blow

There are two types of strokes:

1. ISCHEMIC HUB

An ischemic stroke – which accounts for 80 percent of strokes – occurs when a blood vessel is blocked, preventing blood from entering any part of the brain.

2. HEMORRHAGIC HUB

The rare hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a blood vessel bursts and one part of the brain is flooded with too much blood, while other areas are deprived of adequate blood supply.

This may be the result of AVM or arteriovenous malformation (abnormal accumulation of blood vessels) in the brain.

Thirty percent of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage die before they reach the hospital. Another 25 percent die within 24 hours. And 40 percent of the survivors die within a week.

RISK FACTORS

Age, hypertension, smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, family history and history of previous stroke or previous TIA are all risk factors for stroke.

SYMPTOMS OF A HOOF

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, difficulty speaking or understanding
  • Sudden vision or blurred vision in one or both eyes
  • Sudden difficulty walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden severe headache without known cause

RESULTS

Of the approximately three in four people who survive a stroke, many will have lifelong disabilities.

These include difficulty walking, communicating, eating, and doing everyday tasks or tasks.

TREATMENT

Both are potentially fatal and patients need surgery or a drug called tPA (tissue plasminogen activator) within three hours to save them.

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