The Department of Health and Human Services wants DEA to ban Kratom

The Department of Health and Human Services wants DEA to ban Kratom

WASHINGTON – The Department of Health and Human Services has recommended a ban on chemicals in kratom.

According to STAT News, HHS sent a letter to the Drug Enforcement Administration claiming that two chemicals in Kratom should be classified as a Category 1 substance, meaning that they have "a high potential for abuse" and that "there is currently no medical abuse." Use "for her there.

CONNECTED: The Kratom Controversy: Herbal Supplement or Dangerous Drug?

Kratom, a plant naturally grown in countries such as Thailand and Malaysia, is widely sold as a powder in smokehouses and other locations that can be used in tea to slow down the effects of opioid withdrawal.

However, according to the Food and Drug Administration, it has addictive properties. The FDA said that Kratom carries similar risks of abuse, dependency and, in some cases, death as an opioid. It is also often used restorative for its euphoric effects.

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In addition to the withdrawal of opioids, it is believed that kratom relieves fatigue, pain, cough and diarrhea. Anita Gupta, an osteopathic anesthetist and licensed pharmacist, expressed concern over the increased use of kratom in her chronic pain patients.

Jessica Bardoulas of the American Osteopathic Association, however, said many were "dismayed to learn of the DEA's plan to classify the plan as a" Schedule One "substance.

Because kratom is largely unregulated, "you never know the real strength, the ingredients, or how they are prepared," says Chris Barth, who used the drug Suboxone a decade ago to recover from pain epilepsy.

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"Limited access or lack of knowledge about approved treatments is probably what drives it," said Barth. "It's probably easier to order kratom over the Internet than to find it, if available, and to pay for the FDA-approved, physician-supervised treatment."

© 2018 WUSA

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