The landlords have decided against the owner that this winter, the tenants have cost the energy for the tenants

The landlords have decided against the owner that this winter, the tenants have cost the energy for the tenants

Britain's coldest rented houses could be getting warmer, in line with the government's new energy efficiency rules announced today by landlords.

The owners of the least efficient houses – classified in the worst energy sectors, F and G – have been required since April of this year to convert their property to Volume E or be foreclosed from new tenancies.

Private landlords, however, who faced costs for the improvement of more than £ 2,500, were excluded from the upgrades.

But on Monday, the government announced that the cap would be raised to £ 3,500, releasing fewer landlords.

This means that by 2019, another 290,000 homeowners will be forced to upgrade their homes before they can bring it to the rental market.

According to the government, upgrades cost landlords an average of £ 1,200. However, better insulation can save average tenants £ 180 a year.

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"In line with the consultation proposal, the government intends to amend the rules to introduce a contribution to a limited landlord that will take effect if third party funding is not available or sufficient to cover the costs of improving energy efficiency "says a statement.

The activists said, however, that raising the cap on the landlord's cost from £ 2,500 to £ 3,500 was not good enough.

The Heating and Hot Water Council (HHIC) said the limit should be £ 5,000. It is argued that the ceiling still leaves an unnecessary number of tenants paying for the heating costs of their homes.

Stewart Clements, director of the HHIC, said: "I am pleased that the government has recognized that the leasing sector needs legislation to improve EPC ratings, and the figure of £ 3,500 is better than the £ 2,500 proposed, which is just 30 % of homes have improved their EPC rating.

4 million British households were unable to heat and supply their homes with enough electricity last year

"Nevertheless, HHIC still believes £ 5,000 is the right upper limit, as it would help nearly 60% of the cold, inefficient homes (Band F and G) reach the required EPC level.

"This is because the cost of installing a new central heating system can be £ 4,000, which is $ 500 above the new ceiling, insulation alone does not keep the house warm, you also need an efficient heating system, and gas central heating is the obvious choice Solution. "

According to the National Energy Action, 4 million UK households failed to heat and power their homes in the past year, while in Britain and Wales, 28,884 deaths were caused by fuel poverty.

Minister for Energy and Clean Growth, Claire Perry, said: "While the vast majority of landlords are very proud of their properties, a minority still leases apartments that are difficult to warm.

"Modernizing these homes to make them more energy efficient is one of the most effective ways to fight poverty for fuel and get tenants to lower their tenants' bills, saving them £ 180 a year.

"Everyone should be protected from the cold in their own homes, and today's announcement will bring that reality closer."

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