The lives of children in Yemen are exhausted by malnutrition

The lives of children in Yemen are exhausted by malnutrition

With only nine months, the small Suad clings to a life that runs out with each beat of his weak heart by the acute malnutrition suffered by her and hundreds of thousands of children in Yemen, a country plunged into a war for four years years and in the worst humanitarian crisis in the world.
His mother holds the weakened hand of Suad, who breathes with the help of a mechanical ventilator, in a bed of the Al Sabaain hospital in Sana'a, while the father Saleh Yamaan looks at her leaning against the door trying to hold back the tears that appear in his eyes.
"I have taken her to three different hospitals to receive a treatment for diarrhea, but she did not improve and now she suffers from acute malnutrition," says Yamaan, before babbling "Oh, God!" by raising your hand towards the sky.
Suad's case of acute malnutrition is one of the 1.8 million that currently plague childhood in Yemen, according to Unicef ​​data, including 400,000 with severe acute malnutrition who struggle daily to survive.
In addition, the UN agency estimates that one in three children in Yemen, and one in five pregnant and nursing mothers are at risk of acute malnutrition at a time when 11.3 million children in the country need help humanitarian
Yemen is currently the scene of the worst humanitarian crisis in the world, according to the UN, as the country suffers a civil conflict that began in late 2014 and intensified as of March 2015 due to the intervention of the Arab coalition led by Saudi Arabia, which fights the Houthi rebels.
The bombing of the coalition of Arab countries has ended the lives of children and women in their offensive to try to restore President Abdo Rabu Mansur Hadi in the Government of Sana'a, dominated by the Houthis, who have the support of Iran.
Suad is surrounded by a team of doctors trying to revive her and among them, Dr. Sohir al Madahyi, who explains that the little girl "needs intensive care."
However, that unit in the hospital has been replaced by a department to treat diphtheria by order of the new minister of Health in the Government of the Houthis, Taha Mutawakel, he adds.
The NGO Oxfam Intermón said this month that Yemen has registered more than 1.1 million cases of cholera in the last 18 months, with more than 2,000 deaths, and there have been more than 100 deaths due to diphtheria in a similar period.
The head of the nurses in the unit that treats the cases of malnutrition in the hospital, Fuad al Rimi, indicates that the staff suffers due to "lack of medication" in the center, which "forces the relatives of the patient to buy them out from the hospital at a high price. "
Stresses the "pressure" with which he lives with his companions for "the large number of patients" they treat, since they can not be taken to intensive care after the replacement of the unit for diphtheria.
This is also the "only" hospital dedicated to treat cases of acute malnutrition, he explained, so that children who "suffer from acute malnutrition and who live in areas far from the capital die because of the limited possibilities of their families to pay the price of transportation to take their children to the hospital. "
In that department where they cure the cases of diphtheria, an infectious disease that can end up causing the blockage of the respiratory tract, is Um Eshraq, who takes care of three of his children hospitalized for this disease, two of them in the same bed .
He claims that his eldest daughter died of the disease in a village in the province of Al Mahuit, west of Sanaa. And his brother died shortly after.
Despite the bad news, Suad's health is improving although it is still part of the statistics. (I)

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