The mother of four children is blind in one eye after a vision-robbing amoeba is attached to her cornea

The mother of four children is blind in one eye after a vision-robbing amoeba is attached to her cornea

A four-headed mother was blind in one eye when a parasite caught her cornea after she swam in her local pool while wearing contact lenses.

Stacey Peoples, 49, of Denver, Colorado, was unable to see out of her left eye for months after she had become infected with the rare acanthamoeba keratitis.

She was hospitalized on Independence Day weekend in 2014 when the agony became so intense that she could not get out of bed.

Mrs. Peoples scared her eye like "zombies" and asked the doctors to remove her eye and stop her suffering, but the medical professionals tried to save it.

Ms. Peoples had to use "eye-sucker" every few hours for several months to kill the infection.

Mrs. Peoples even wondered if she wanted to live at all.

However, in April 2015, the headmistress underwent a cornea transplantation that restored her eyesight to 20/20.

Stacey Peoples could not see out of her left eye for months after she had been infected with the rare Akanthamoeba keratitis. After the procedure, she is portrayed as a school administrator after being forced to take a seven-month break during her recovery

Stacey Peoples could not see out of her left eye for months after she had been infected with the rare Akanthamoeba keratitis. After the procedure, she is portrayed as a school administrator after being forced to take a seven-month break during her recovery

Stacey Peoples was blinded in one eye when a parasite caught her cornea after she swam in her local pool while wearing contact lenses. During her recovery, she was hospitalized on the weekend of July 4, 2014, when the pain was too severe for her to move

Stacey Peoples was blinded in one eye when a parasite caught her cornea after she swam in her local pool while wearing contact lenses. During her recovery, she was hospitalized on the weekend of July 4, 2014, when the pain was too severe for her to move

She compared the pain to "someone who snaps a rubber band against my eyeball every four or five seconds." "The back of my head felt like it was blowing out the back of my head," she added

She compared the pain to "someone who snaps a rubber band against my eyeball every four or five seconds." "My back felt like it was blowing out the back of my brain," she added

Regarding the Independence Day weekend, Ms. Peoples said, "When we were in the cabin on the fourth weekend of July, I just went straight to bed.

"The pain was so intense. It felt like someone grabbed a rubber band against my eyeball every four or five seconds.

"My back felt like it was going to burst the back of my brain."

Ms. Peoples also developed a severe migraine and a constantly watering eyes and nose.

"I did not know you could make that much liquid," she said. "My eye looked like a zombie.

"It was completely cloudy and the white of my eye was bright red and so rough."

Ms. Peoples' pain became so severe that she had to be hospitalized in Traverse City, Michigan, where doctors were initially confused, which was wrong.

"They booked an appointment with a cornea specialist and after looking into my eye, she went to medical books. It was very disturbing, "she said.

She told me that she believed I had an amoeba, and when I was relieved, they finally had an idea of ​​what was going on. I did not know what I was aiming for.

"She said," We must try to save the eye and worry about seeing later. "

  After her hospital discharge, Ms. Peoples (picture before her transplant) had to put "Pool Cleaner" in her eyes every two hours to kill the infection. In agony she just said that she had moved from my bed to my rocking chair and back again.

After being released from the hospital, Ms. Peoples (picture before her transplant) had to put "Pool Cleaner" in her eyes every two hours to kill the infection. In agony she just said she moved from my bed to my rocking chair and back again.

Before she was taken to the hospital, she claimed that her eyes were clouded like a zombie. She also struggled with an intense migraine and a constantly running eye and nose

Before being taken to the hospital, she claimed that her eye was "tarnished like a zombie". She also struggled with an intense migraine and a constantly running eye and nose

WHY SHOULD YOU NOT FLOAT WHILE YOU WEAR CONTACT LENSES?

When swimming with contact lenses there is a risk of blindness.

Acanthamoeba Keratitis (AK), an amoeba that occurs throughout the world, can affect the cornea – the "clear window" on the front of the eye.

The burrowing amoeba can penetrate through the eyeball and cause vision loss within a few weeks.

An analysis of all incidents recorded in the past 18 years revealed that 86 percent of the patients had their lenses swum. This is evident from a study published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Contact lenses can produce small eye abrasions that facilitate the attachment of the amoeba when the eye comes in contact with water.

In addition to the risk of swimming, scientists also risked washing lenses with tap water.

Acanthamoeba, which feed on bacteria, can be present in all forms of water, including lakes, seas, rivers, swimming pools, whirlpools and even showers.

It can also be found in tap water and soil.

Although AK is generally harmless to humans, corneal infections can be extremely painful.

The treatment usually involves antiseptic drops that kill the amoeba, which may need to be taken every hour during the first few days, even during sleep.

Source: Moorfields Eye Hospital

The pain was so extreme that Mrs. Peoples even asked the doctors to remove her eye. The doctors, however, insisted that they tried to save it.

"At the time, I had completely lost my point of view, all I could see was white," she said.

To kill the infection, Ms. Peoples had to apply eye drops every two hours for five months, her agony meaning she could not move far from her bed.

In the fight against the illness she had to take seven months vacation.

"I was prescribed eye drops that basically contain a pool cleaner to kill the parasite. I had to put her in my eyes every two hours for months on end, "said Ms. Peoples.

"I used the drops every two hours until December, and during those months I moved from my bed to my rocking chair and back again. I could not do anything else.

"I had two or three very dark days when I thought this pain was too big, it would be better if I was not here."

  Although Ms. Peoples could sometimes smile while recovering, she admits that she also had dark days wondering if it would be better if she was not alive

Although Ms. Peoples sometimes smiled during her recovery, she admits that she also had dark days when she asked if it would be better if she was not alive

Before Mrs. Peoples was treated, she lost all sight from her left eye until all she could see was "white." The doctors struggled hard to save their eyes, but at the cost of their sight

Before she was treated, Mrs. Peoples lost all sight from her left eye until all she could see was "white." The doctors fought hard for her eye, but at the expense of her vision

However, in April of the following year, Ms. Peoples luck had changed when she was undergoing a corneal transplant at the Good Samaritan Medical Center in Lafayette.

And only a day later she could see again.

Regarding the procedure, Ms. Peoples said, "They removed and replaced my damaged cornea.

"When the patch broke two days after surgery, it was amazing. I went to the hospital and could not see, then came out and could see so clearly.

"It was wonderful, I have some depth perception problems, but with glasses I have 20/20 vision.

"I am now a big proponent of organ donation, because this would not be visible to my generous donor."

However, in April 2015, Ms. Peoples' fortune changed when she underwent a corneal transplant. Following the procedure, she described the results as "amazing" if she could only see the next day. She now has a 20/20 vision with glasses and has become an advocate of organ donation

However, in April 2015, Ms. Peoples' fortune changed when she underwent a corneal transplant. After the procedure, she described the results as "amazing" if she could only see the next day. She now has a 20/20 vision with glasses and has become an advocate of organ donation

Following the transplant, Ms. Peoples claim she can now see "so clearly"

After the transplant, Ms. Peoples now sees "so clearly"

After her ordeal, Ms. Peoples warns others to avoid wearing contacts in the water.

"The reason I tell my story is to warn people not to keep their contacts in the water or even in the shower," she said.

"This is rare, but it can happen. Even if you have been like me for 20 years.

Doctors tell you not to do it. My doctors think I found this in the pool while wearing my contacts.

"I'm just happy that I have such a wonderful family. Otherwise I would never have gotten through. "

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 85 percent of cases of acanthamoeba keratitis occur in contact lens users.

Contact lenses can produce small eye abrasions that facilitate the attachment of the amoeba when the eye comes in contact with water.

Pictured is the cabin in Traverse City, Michigan, where Ms. Peoples' condition deteriorated progressively on the weekend of July 4, 2014. Due to her agony, she was unable to attend the celebrations

Pictured is the cabin in Traverse City, Michigan, where Ms. Peoples' condition deteriorated progressively on the weekend of July 4, 2014. Due to her agony, she was unable to attend the celebrations

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