The number of orangutans is still declining, despite claims by the Indonesian government

The number of orangutans is still declining, despite claims by the Indonesian government

Orangutans are slowly disappearing from the rainforests and, despite claims by the Indonesian government, are nearing extinction, researchers say.

Officials were beaten for suggesting that primates celebrate a comeback. The population doubled within a year,

The great apes – what experts say are actually in decline – are currently only found in the rainforests of Borneo and Sumatra and are classified as "critically endangered".

A recent Indonesian report claimed that the orangutan population increased by more than 10 percent between 2015 and 2017.

This has been described by science as "biologically impossible" and directly contradicts its research base.

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Orangutans are slowly disappearing from the rainforests and, despite claims by the Indonesian government, are nearing extinction, researchers say. Officials slammed for suggesting primates make a comeback (picture in stock)

Orangutans are slowly disappearing from the rainforests and, despite claims by the Indonesian government, are nearing extinction, researchers say. Officials slammed for suggesting primates make a comeback (picture in stock)

Orangutans are slowly disappearing from the rainforests and, despite claims by the Indonesian government, are nearing extinction, researchers say. Officials slammed for suggesting primates make a comeback (picture in stock)

The controversial Indonesian report focused on nine landmarks including national parks.

Their data suggest that the population of orangutans has doubled within one year, from 2015 to 2015 (1,351).

Most scientific data show that the survival of orangutan species through deforestation and killing remains seriously threatened.

For example, a study in Current Biology earlier this year indicated that Borneo lost more than 100,000 orangutans between 1999 and 2015.

Doctor Erik Meijaard of Borneo Futures and the IUCN Species Survival Commission said, "All three orangutan species are threatened with extinction and are in a steep decline.

"Their numbers are not rising, like the Indonesian government report

"It's biologically impossible for an orangutan population to double in size within a year."

Dr. Meijaard pointed out that some of the sampling sites are used for the introduction and relocation of orangutans, so any expansion of these areas would inevitably require a reduction elsewhere.

A recent Indonesian report claimed that the orangutan population increased by more than 10 percent between 2015 and 2017. This is directly contrary to the belief of the scientific community, based on legitimate published research and peer review peer-reviewed

A recent Indonesian report claimed that the orangutan population increased by more than 10 percent between 2015 and 2017. This is directly contrary to the belief of the scientific community, based on legitimate published research and peer review peer-reviewed

A recent Indonesian report claimed that the orangutan population increased by more than 10 percent between 2015 and 2017. This is directly contrary to the belief of the scientific community, based on legitimate published research and peer review peer-reviewed

It is unclear what the report will mean for the future of orangutans, he warned.

Dr. Meijaard also pointed out that the Indonesian government is currently developing a new 10-year action plan for orangutan protection.

"If the government believes that the orangutan population is growing, very different strategies are needed than dealing with rapidly declining populations," he added.

"It is important for the government to recognize that population numbers continue to decline. Therefore, a new approach to orangutan conservation is needed. "

The full results were published in a letter to the journal Current Biology.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ORANGUTANIC SPECIES?

A new orangutan species was discovered in 2017.

The first signs of the uniqueness of the new species came from the skeletal material of an adult male orangutan killed in 2013.

Compared to other skulls, certain features of the teeth and skull were unique.

Previous study results in combination with the new genome sequencing of 37 orangutans showed an image consistent with morphological findings.

The first signs of the uniqueness of the new species came from the skeletal material of an adult male orangutan killed in 2013.

The first signs of the uniqueness of the new species came from the skeletal material of an adult male orangutan killed in 2013.

The first signs of the uniqueness of the new species came from the skeletal material of an adult male orangutan killed in 2013.

By computer modeling to reconstruct the history of the orangutan population, the researchers were able to review their new findings.

Their calculations showed that the Tapanuli population was isolated from all other Sumatran populations of orangutans for at least 10,000 to 20,000 years.

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