The sad story of a first-class doctor in Paddy Power chopping off his friend's head

The sad story of a first-class doctor in Paddy Power chopping off his friend's head

In a shocking incident that shocked the nation, a top doctor was found guilty of murder after beheading his friend in a bookmaker.

Armed with four knives, Hassan Mustafa, the son of a Sudanese diplomat, used his medical skills to behead and mutilate Khalid Yousef in a paddy power business.

The crime took place in January this year, when Mustafa tracked his friend Khalid Yousef to the bookies on Rookery Road, Handsworth, and murdered him in front of terrified staff and customers.

Birmingham Live reports that Mustafa beheaded Mr. Yousef before mutilating his face and hand.

With a smile on his face, the killer told the policeman that he had done it.

Today the jury members have decided that Mustafa did not commit murder because of the madness.

In court, it was assumed that 35-year-old Mustafa had paranoid schizophrenia and was legally mentally ill when he slaughtered Mr. Yousef at lunch on January 4.

In his schizophrenic mind he developed deluded thoughts for months, believing that both himself and Mr. Yousef were competing members of the League of Extraordinary Gentleman, characters in a comic and film.

The scene outside Paddy Power Bookmaker at Rookery Road, Wandsworth, Birmingham.
The scene outside Paddy Power Bookmaker at Rookery Road, Wandsworth, Birmingham.

In his deceived mind, the two of them, on behalf of the Queen, who was his wife Caroline, would compete for clues to treasure, including debit cards, money, keys, and cash.

He considered Mr. Yousef a threat to the world, a shapeshifter who had to die "to save the world."

Mustafa and Mr. Yousef met when they both came to the UK from Sudan in 2013 after applying for political asylum in 2013.

Mustafa was a qualified surgeon who was in the top five percent of the students in America.

Shortly before, Mustafa had told his parents that he no longer wanted a career as a doctor.

The two men lived together in an apartment in Liverpool before moving to Birmingham and living apart.

While Mustafa took jobs like a carer and worker, Mr. Yousef found work in a hotel in Birmingham and later in Boots.

Mustafa went on to marry his wife Caroline and lived on Stratford Road, Sparkbrook, while Mr. Yousef went to live on Greenhill Road, Handsworth.

The two men remained friends, but Mr. Yousef increasingly distanced himself in the months leading up to the murder, as Mustafa acted more and more strangely.

Mr. Yousef's friend said that Mustafa would knock on the door to see him, and Khalid would hide and say, "I do not want to see him."

Mr. Yousef was a regular at Paddy Power and Mustafa knew he would find him there.

CCTV caught the moment when Mustafa entered Paddy Power's shop.

A few minutes later, he asked Mr. Yousef with up to four knives if he could say anything outside where they started fighting.

Mr. Yousef went back in, followed by Mustafa with a bread knife.

Despite efforts by customers and employees to end the fight, it escalated and as Mustafa began to stab his victim, Paddy Power's manager unleashed the "Mist Cannon" that filled the shop with smoke.

As frightened employees hid in the background, armed police stormed the bookmakers.

Khalid Yousef was killed by his former roommate Hassan Mustafa at a betting shop

As the fog cleared, you saw Mr. Yousef's body lying on the customer's door – Mustafa stood over him.

Mr. Yousef had been beheaded, and his face and right hand were mutilated.

An autopsy revealed that the mutilation had been "done with some skill" – possibly reflecting the training that the killer received for medical qualifications.

When Mustafa was taken out of the bookmakers, who were covered in blood, he was asked who had killed the man in it.

Mustafa calmly said "It was me," but did not want to explain why at that moment.

While he was in an ambulance being treated for a hand injury, he remarked, "There's no suspicion about me, I did it, it was for the Lord."

In an interview he later revealed to psychiatrist Dr. Dinesh Maganty, why he killed his friend.

He said, "He was a villain, he was trying to turn the nations of the world against each other, he had sex with my wife Caroline and he had to die to save everyone, I killed the villain and saved nations."

After months of treatment for schizophrenia, he regained his health and was appalled to discover exactly what he had done to his friend in such horrific ways.

Tragically, for both Mustafa and Mr. Yousef, the cruel murder would never have happened if red flags that highlighted his schizophrenia had been raised.

After the murder, Mustafa's family told the police they were worried when he visited them in Brighton because he was acting strangely and was afraid of a fox in the garden whom he believed could change.

The Courts of Queen Elizabeth II, Birmingham

Mustafa's family had a history of schizophrenia on both sides and his uncle, who was suffering from the same mental illness, starved to death after leaving the family and convinced that his family wanted to poison him.

On December 12, last year, Mustafa was arrested for burglary after being caught by staff in a building in Birmingham.

He told the police and a local psychiatric nurse that they should seek a treasure as part of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, but he was not referred to a mental health team for further assessment.

These signs of Mustafa's worsening mind were accepted as "missed opportunities" by two senior psychiatrists testifying in court. It was accepted that the tragic events of 4 January would most likely not have taken place if they had been picked up.

Judge Melbourne Inman said after the verdict, "This is a very sad and tragic case, because of the terrible mental illness he suffered Restriction Order: Mr. Mustafa will return to the Reaside Clinic, but a decision as to whether he will ever be released is met by the Secretary of State, I can not understand the grief that the family of Mr. Yousef suffered, but they were so great. "

In response to the verdict, Detective Inspector Jim Colclough of the West Midlands Homicide Division added, "This was a horrific and groundless attack on a young man who had his whole life ahead of him.

"I want to thank Paddy Power employees for their courageous actions, I can not imagine how appalled they were, and our thoughts remain with Khalid's family even at this difficult time."

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