The taxation of beef, lamb and pork could "prevent about 220,000 deaths annually".

The taxation of beef, lamb and pork could "prevent about 220,000 deaths annually".

A "meat tax" on bacon, burgers and beef could save around 220,000 lives and £ 30.7 billion worldwide within two years, experts said.

The production of red meat, which is strongly linked to cancer and heart disease and more expensive, could encourage people to switch to healthier alternatives.

In the UK, this could prevent 6,000 deaths per year and save more than £ 700 million that would otherwise have been spent on health care.

However, he could increase the price of red meats such as minced meat and steak by 14 percent and the cost of processed meats such as bacon and burgers by 79 percent.

Oxford University researchers said that eating red and processed meat kills 2.4 million people a year and costs the world economy £ 219 billion.

They acknowledged, "No one wants governments to tell people what they can eat," but reducing red meat would be better for human health and for the earth.

In the UK, an optimal meat tax could increase the cost of red meat by 14 percent and processed meat by 79 percent, the researchers said, which would increase prices on the supermarket shelves (Figure: Examples of how supermarket prices might change at prices from Tesco Direct)

In the UK, an optimal meat tax could increase the cost of red meat by 14 percent and processed meat by 79 percent, the researchers said, which would increase prices on the supermarket shelves (Figure: Examples of how supermarket prices might change at prices from Tesco Direct)

In the UK, an optimal meat tax could increase the cost of red meat by 14 percent and processed meat by 79 percent, the researchers said, which would increase prices on the supermarket shelves (Figure: Examples of how supermarket prices might change at prices from Tesco Direct)

The lead researcher Marco Springmann said: "Consumption of red and processed meat is above recommended levels in most high and middle income countries.

"This has a significant impact not only on personal health, but also on the health systems that are being funded by taxpayers in many countries, and on the economy losing its workforce due to sickness and care of sick family members.

"I hope governments will introduce a health tax on red and processed meats to help consumers make healthy and sustainable choices.

"A health tax on red and processed meat would not limit choices, but send a strong signal to consumers and relieve our health systems."

The amount of meat tax would vary in different countries around the world, depending on how much meat they eat and how much it costs to buy them.

The study estimated that a tax could reduce the intake of processed meats such as bacon and sausage in high-income countries by about two parts per week.

FIVE WAYS TO EARN PEOPLE TO EAT LESS MEAT

Filippo Bianchi, an experienced Oxford University researcher, suggested five ways people can prevent people from eating as much red meat as they do with cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

He writes for The Conversation:

1. Reduce portion size

Reducing the standard serving size of meat products is a promising way. One study found that reducing the standard portion of meat dishes in restaurants resulted in each customer consuming an average of 28g less meat in these dishes, without affecting his overall restaurant experience.

Another study found that adding smaller sausages to supermarket shelves was associated with a 13% reduction in meat purchases. Simply offering smaller portions of meat in supermarkets can also help reduce meat consumption.

2. Design greener menus

Another difference is the way food is displayed on restaurant menus. Research has shown that creating an exclusive vegetarian section at the bottom of a restaurant menu reduces the likelihood that people will taste plant-based foods.

When the meat options are displayed on a separate restaurant board with only herbal options on the standard menu, the probability that a meat-free option was chosen was four times higher, according to a study conducted in a simulated canteen.

3. Position the meat out of sight

Research has shown that the visualization of vegetarian options over meat at the bar of a university canteen was associated with a 6% increase in the choice of meat-free dishes.

And when it comes to a buffet, it's probably the best way to place the meat options at the end of the aisle. A small study found that this buffet could reduce people's meat intake by up to 20 percent. However, given the small sample size, further research is needed to confirm this finding.

4. Help people to make the obvious connection

Reminding people of where the meat actually comes from can also have a big impact on how much meat people finally eat.

Research shows, for example, that the image of a roast pork with tailed pig's head enhances people's need for a herbal alternative.

5. Develop delicious meat-free products

Of course, it's a good idea to make vegetarian dishes so delicious that you can keep up with the meat dishes.

A recent study found that increasing the appearance and appeal of meatless options on the menu of a simulated university cafeteria doubled the number of people choosing meatless meals over traditional meat dishes.

So it's still early days and much research is needed to understand how to encourage people to eat less meat. Ultimately, however, it will be crucial to accept meat-free options to reduce long-term meat consumption.

Source: The conversation

Scientific evidence links eating red meat to cancer, heart disease and stroke, and limiting food consumption by making it expensive could reduce the number of people dying from related diseases, experts say

Scientific evidence links eating red meat to cancer, heart disease and stroke, and limiting food consumption by making it expensive could reduce the number of people dying from related diseases, experts say

Scientific evidence links eating red meat to cancer, heart disease and stroke, and limiting food consumption by making it expensive could reduce the number of people dying from related diseases, experts say

In the UK, red meat could rise by 14 percent and processed meat by 79 percent, Dr Springmann said.

However, the UK is fairly light – the processed meat tax in the US could reach 163 percent, compared to 185 percent in Sweden.

In the UK, for example, the price of an eight-pack of Tesco British Pork Sausages could rise from £ 1.70 to £ 3.04.

Or four of Tesco's 1/4-pound beef burger could cost £ 4.48 instead of the current £ 2.50.

The price hike would be more modest for fresh red meats like steak – a sirloin steak could rise from £ 3.80 to £ 4.33 or lamb chops from £ 2.05 to £ 2.34.

In the US, the tax would have to be higher, which would increase meat costs by 34 percent and meat products by 163 percent.

HOW THE MEAT CAN CHANGE SUPERMARKET PRICES

Based on the possible tax rates of 14 percent for unprocessed red meat and 79 percent for processed meat, these are some examples of how Tesco prices might change:

Tesco Smoked Back Bacon Baconstrip 300G

  • Now: £ 1.50
  • With taxes: 2.69 £

Tesco British Pork Sausages 8 Pack 454G

  • Now: £ 1.70
  • With taxes: £ 3.04

Tesco 4 1 / 4Lb Beef Burger 454G

  • Now: £ 2.50
  • With taxes: £ 4.48

Tesco Beef Lean Steak Minced Meat 500g 5% fat

  • Now: £ 3.39
  • With taxes: £ 3.87

Tesco beef fillet 227G

  • Now: € 3.80
  • With taxes: £ 4.33

Tesco lamb chops 150G

  • Now: £ 2.05
  • With taxes: £ 2.34

The prices are all from Tesco Direct

An effective tax in Sweden increased the price of processed meat by a whopping 185 percent and the price of red meat by 27 percent.

In China, however, the tax rates were much lower – only seven percent for red meat and 43 percent for processed meat.

The effective taxation of meat in Germany meant that red meat was 28 percent more expensive and the price of processed meat rose by 166 percent.

The same policy in Denmark resulted in a taxation of 29 percent for red meat and 119 percent for processed meat.

The potential global benefits of cutting meat include cutting processed meat by 16 percent and preventing 222,000 deaths from cancer, heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes.

In addition, an estimated 3,800 deaths from obesity were prevented, the study said.

In the UK alone, an effective meat tax that compensates for health costs would prevent 5,920 deaths per year. This would reduce the deaths caused by eating meat by 15.6 percent.

Louise Meincke of the World Cancer Research Fund said: "Governments need to introduce more evidence-based policies to make our daily lives healthier so that people can make those healthy choices more easily.

"This study shows the potential impact of a meat tax and could show that meat consumption can be reduced similar to a sugar-saturated beverage tax. It also offsets health system costs and improves environmental sustainability. & # 39;

A higher tax on processed meats would discourage consumers from eating so much and turning them into unprocessed meat, which is considered healthier, according to the researchers.

The World Health Organization has classified beef, lamb and pork as carcinogenic – that is, causing cancer – when consumed in processed form.

And the meat is still "probably carcinogenic" if left unprocessed.

The consumption of red meat has also been linked to increased rates of coronary heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes.

The research was published in the journal Public Library of Science ONE.

WHAT IS THE SUGAR TAX?

What is the sugar tax?

Since 6 April 2018, soft drink companies have had to pay a levy on sugar-added drinks.

Why is the government introducing the tax?

The step is designed to help fight childhood obesity. Sugar-sweetened soft drinks are today the largest food source of sugar for children and adolescents.

It is hoped that the tax will encourage beverage companies to reduce the amount of sugar in beverages and consumers to opt for lower sugar alternatives.

What is the tax?

Companies must pay 18 liters per liter of beverage if the product contains more than 5 g of sugar per 100 milliliters, and 24 percent per liter if it contains 8 g of sugar per 100 milliliters.

The prices of some popular drinks have increased, and the recipes of others have changed due to the new law to absorb less sugar.

Does it apply to all drinks?

The new levy is not paid for milk drinks and fruit juices.

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