The US Olympic Committee is trying to revoke the USA Gymnastics as a national body

The US Olympic Committee is trying to revoke the USA Gymnastics as a national body

The US Olympic Committee prefers to revoke the status of USA Gymnastics as a governing body for the Olympic sport. This is a reaction to an organization that has messed up its own restructuring in the wake of a sex abuse scandal involving ex-wives, team doctor Larry Nassar.

In an open letter to the gymnastics community on Monday, USOC chief executive Sarah Hirshland said, "They make better money," and that the challenges US gymnastics faces are more than it can overcome.

According to its statutes, the USOC has the power to review all matters relating to the continued recognition of a national governing body. In this first step, he could force the USA Gymnastics to clear the decks and rebuild their organization from scratch. There were no immediate words about how this would affect the status of gymnasts or their participation in future competitions. But Hirshland addressed this concern in her open letter.

"You no doubt wonder what that means for you and the gymnastic community," she wrote. "Until the process is complete and a final decision is made on the status of USAG, we will ensure that the gymnastics and competitions continue as usual, I do not know how long the process will take, and we will do anything to continue fast. "

USA Gymnastics not only supports elite and Olympic athletes, but serves more than 150,000 athletes in 3,000 clubs across the country.

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The move will take place on Monday after Mary Bono, interim CEO of USA Gymnastics, resigned four days after taking office. Bono's selection was immediately criticized by a number of high-caliber gymnasts, including Gold Medal Gold Medalist, Simone Biles and Aly Raisman. Raisman questioned Bono's relationship with law firm Faegre Baker Daniels, who advised USA Gymnastics during the scandal surrounding Larry Nassar.

Bono is the second short-lived interim leader of the USA Gymnastics in the last two years. Following the resignation of former President Steve Penny in March 2017, the organization has struggled to find leadership to drive development. Penny was arrested last month for alleged manipulation of evidence related to the Nassar case.

He decided not to answer questions about his knowledge of the abuse of Nassar when members of the US Senate forced him to sit in Washington DC for a subcommittee hearing this summertime.

The entire Board of Directors of the USA Gymnastics resigned in January 2018 after a Michigan judge sentenced Nassar to 175 years in prison for his crimes.

Her deputies released a statement Monday after the announcement of the USOC saying, "We want you to know that we will continue to serve the thousands of young athletes, coaches, club owners, judges and administrators that make up our organization. Our commitment will always be We must know that this continues to be a difficult time for our organization, and we are so grateful for everything you do to support our gymnast community. "

Hundreds of former gymnasts have filed civil suits, including USAG and USOC. However, they have failed to fulfill their responsibilities towards the young athletes in their care. Several mediation attempts failed to reach agreement in these lawsuits, and ongoing investigations and discussions between the various parties were not going well, according to attorney John Manly, who represents many of these women.

Manly said the USOC was "equally guilty" for ignoring complaints about Nassar, such as the USAG, and the organization's decision to start the decommissioning process for USAG was long overdue.

"Any reasonable observer or anyone who really cares about children would have done that two years ago," Manly said Monday. "I'm very happy that it happens, but it's not the generosity or intelligence of the USOC that's because hundreds of women – some of whom are world-famous and others whose names will never be known – have told the truth Social Media, to the press and members of the US Senate. "

Manly said the politicians and gymnasts who continued to put pressure on national organizations deserve recognition. He said Rachael Denhollander and Jamie Dantzscher, the first two women publicly accused of misconduct by Nassar, deserve a special mention.

"I am very grateful," Denhollander said on Monday evening when asked about the USOC's decision. "I wish they had taken that step two years ago when the USAG first made it clear that they would not recognize and deal with the problems that their organization has been facing for decades.

"If you have an organization that has presided over the abuse of hundreds of children, and they refuse to admit it, and refuse to clean it up, then the decertification needs to happen – this is for every survivor and every other potential victim."

ESPN's Dan Murphy and information from The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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