Theresa May's claim that she was prepared to take Britain out of the EU without a deal seemed increasingly troublesome on Wednesday, as the Prime Minister's allies admitted that a series of ministerial resignations could force them to abandon the strategy.

Ms. May wishes to keep the prospect of a chaotic Brexit on the table in order to put pressure on Brussels to conclude a revised exit agreement after the House of Commons had explicitly rejected his resignation agreement last month.

However, Ms May's aides conceded that a move by former Labor Minister Yvette Cooper and Conservative grandfather Oliver Letwin to take down a no-deal Brexit was likely put to a vote on February 27 in an important vote Would gain support from MEPs.

Downing Street takes the threat seriously that a number of Europhile ministers will finally overcome their threat to support the initiative of Mrs Cooper and Sir Oliver. "This will definitely be lunch," said a cabinet minister. "We can not wait anymore."

Maysay's "My Deal or No Deal" strategy was further undermined when Olly Robbins, her chief negotiator in the EU, was overheard in a Brussels hotel and said that if a revised withdrawal agreement were rejected by MEPs, it would rather delay Brexit They crash Britain from the block.

But on Wednesday, Ms. May's spokesman said to Ms. May's line, "If you ask me a question, if there's no deal on the table, the answer is yes.

European ministers argue that the threat of a no-deal-Brexit by Ms. May is causing considerable damage to the British business before the planned departure date on March 29.

One minister said he would "definitely" stop if Ms. May did not voluntarily rule out that the United Kingdom would crash without agreement from the EU.

Another minister called on the Prime Minister to allow her deputies to vote freely on the proposed amendment by Mrs Cooper and Sir Oliver: 'It would not look good if there were 15 ministers to resign in bulk or dismiss us.'

The amendment would give Parliament the power to block a no-deal Brexit if Ms May had not received Parliament's approval for a revised withdrawal agreement by mid-March.

A similar move led by Ms. Cooper was rejected by the Commons last month with 23 votes, but a Downing Street insider admitted, "It looks like it could survive this period."

In order to reduce defeat, Ms May in Brussels will step up her efforts to reach an improved resignation agreement before the amendment by Mrs Cooper and Sir Oliver is put to the vote on 27 February.

EU diplomats and most Conservative MPs, however, find it unlikely that Ms. May will achieve her goal in less than two weeks.

Ms. May wants the so-called backstop plan in the withdrawal agreement to be changed to avoid a hard Irish border.

Donald Tusk, President of the European Council, Tweeted on Wednesday: "No message is not always good news. The EU27 is still waiting for concrete, realistic proposals from London to break the # Brexit impasse. "

Meanwhile, European Conservative MEPs threatened to vote on Thursday's Brexit plan by Ms. May

They expressed their concern that a parliamentary motion on Mrs May's efforts to secure a modified resignation agreement seemed to close a no-deal Brexit.

The seemingly lenient motion, on behalf of the Prime Minister, effectively endorses two amendments supported by MPs last month to replace the Irish base with "alternative arrangements" and reject a no-deal Brexit.

Both amendments were not binding on the government, but the Eurosceptic Tories said they would vote against Parliament's latest motion if it were not reformulated to clarify a no-deal Brexit.

Additional coverage by Jim Brunsden in Brussels

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