To the moon and beyond: Airbus delivers powerhouse for ...

To the moon and beyond: Airbus delivers powerhouse for ...

The European Airbus announced Friday that it has delivered the "powerhouse" for NASA's new Orion spacecraft, which will bring astronauts to the Moon and beyond in the years to come and has reached an important milestone in hundreds of future orders Should reach millions of euros.

The engineers at the Airbus plant in Bremen carefully packed the spacecraft on Thursday in a special container, which will fly aboard a huge Antonov cargo plane to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This is a first step on the way to space.

In Florida, the Orion crew module built by Lockheed Martin is added. Afterwards, more than one year of intensive testing is performed before the first three-week mission orbiting the Moon starts in 2020, but without people.

Airbus employees prepare the European Service Module (ESM) for the US space probe "Orion" on November 1, 2018 in Bremen before delivery to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

WHAT IS IT?

Airbus' European service module will provide the Orion crew module with propulsion, power, thermal control and consumables. This is the first time that NASA will use a system built in Europe as an important element for propelling an American spacecraft.

The current plans envisage a first occupation in 2022. Each year, NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA) plan to launch a manned mission, making the Orion project politically and economically important at a time when China and other countries in the race are gaining ground in space.

Airbus' European service module will provide the Orion crew module with propulsion, power, thermal control and consumables. This is the first time that NASA will use a system built in Europe as an important element for propelling an American spacecraft.

"This is a very big step," said Oliver Juckenhoefel, vice president of on-orbit services and exploration for Airbus, Reuters.

"The delivery and the flight to America are just the beginning of a journey that will ultimately take us to 60,000 miles behind the moon, more than any human ever flew before."

In Florida, the Orion crew module built by Lockheed Martin is added. Afterwards, more than one year of intensive testing is performed before the first three-week mission orbiting the Moon starts in 2020, but without people.

In Florida, the Orion crew module built by Lockheed Martin is added. Afterwards, more than one year of intensive testing is performed before the first three-week mission orbiting the Moon starts in 2020, but without people.

Orion is part of a growing effort to bring people to the moon, where the unexpected discovery of the water has powered the scientists. Rapid technological development, such as 3D printing, paves the way for a lunar-based infrastructure, such as data server relay stations in the coming years.

"It sounds like science fiction, but I'm convinced that it will come, the only question for us in Europe is whether we want to be part of it or not," said Juckenhoefel.

"In the industry, we have to be careful that we do not miss the boat."

Airbus received an order worth 390 million euros (446.12 million US dollars) for the construction of the first ESM module in 2014 and is already working on a second order worth 200 million euros.

Now he is negotiating with ESA on further contracts, which could amount to one billion euros, he said.

Mike Hawes, who runs the $ 11 billion Orion program for Lockheed, said it would play a crucial role in exploring space. NASA had already tried to land people on the moon, and many talked about possible missions to Mars.

Nasas Orion, stacked on a Space Launch System rocket capable of lifting 70 tons, will launch in 2020 from a recently renovated Kennedy Space Center.

Launched in 2020, the NASA Orion of NASA, based on a Space Launch System rocket capable of lifting 70 tons, will launch from a recently renovated Kennedy Space Center.

He said Lockheed negotiated with NASA for up to 12 follow-on missions, which could lead to billions in new orders as he worked to halve the cost of future spacecraft.

Initially, the Orion of NASA, located on a space launch system rocket capable of lifting 70 tons, will be launched from a newly renovated Kennedy Space Center in 2020.

The unscrewed Orion will travel into the distant retrograde orbit, breaking the distance record reached by the farthest Apollo spaceship, and then 30,000 miles (275,000 miles in total).

The mission will last 22 days and was designed to test system readiness for future occupation operations.

WHAT ARE NASA PLANS FOR ORION?

The Orion of NASA, piled on a Space Launch System rocket capable of lifting 70 tons, will launch in 2019 from a recently renovated Kennedy Space Center for the EM-1 mission.

The unscrewed Orion will travel into the distant retrograde orbit, breaking the distance record reached by the farthest Apollo spaceship, and then 30,000 miles (275,000 miles in total).

The mission will last 22 days and was designed to test system readiness for future occupation operations.

Following the unmanned space flight tests, the first test flight with crew will be started.

While NASA has worked hard over the last few months to prepare the Orion and SLS missiles for an unmanned flight next year, the space agency and its partners are already looking to the future. The impression of an artist is shown

While NASA has worked hard over the last few months to prepare the Orion and SLS missiles for an unmanned flight next year, the space agency and its partners are already looking to the future. The impression of an artist is shown

According to NASA, this could already happen in August 2021.

Although the crew size is set closer to takeoff, the space agency plans to fly up to four astronauts.

Orion will carry the crew around the earth in two orbits to make sure everything is working properly.

They will perform different orbits to finally find their way to the moon.

The crew will fly around the back of the moon and make an eight before returning to Earth with the moon's magnetism. "Like a slingshot to bring Orion home," says NASA.

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