Wash. Company puts Gab, a platform for racists, back online

Wash. Company puts Gab, a platform for racists, back online

SAMMAMISH, WA – Gab, a Twitter-based social media platform used by Nazis and white supremacists, returns to the Internet using a Sammamish-based domain provider. Gab was thrown off the Internet after a user massacred a Pittsburgh synagogue on October 27.

Robert W. Monster, CEO of domain provider Epik, said in a statement that "digital censorship" on a site like Gab is wrong.

Gab was founded by Andrew Torba as an alternative to Twitter and attracted many people whose words they had banished from this site. Robert Bowers, who allegedly killed eleven people in the synagogue "Tree of Life" last week, was a user of Gab.

Immediately before the shoot, Bowers allegedly wrote to Gab: "Screw your optics, I'm going in." Bowers' profile also called the Jewish people "the children of Satan".

As a result of the massacre, domain sites like GoDaddy refused to host Gab. Gabs reappearance was first reported on Saturday by KUOW.

In his statement, Monster said that tolerance to different aspects should be part of society.

"The de-platforming of an oasis of freedom of expression is not about left-wing or right-wing anyone who remembers to study citizenship knows the concept of inalienable rights – rights that only a dignified government can protect, but not moral ones The Idea Natural right and inalienable right, if not before, come from Ancient Greece Tolerance to rival views – including those protected by freedom of speech and press freedom – is not an American concept, although the founding fathers The United States was wealthy nation around the concept.

From 17.00 clock On Saturday Gab was still a static homepage with a message about the massacre of tree of life.

According to the state documents, Epik is located in Sammamish; The company maintains a mailbox in Bellevue and has offices in Seattle. Government records show that Epik is ruled by Monster and Cliff Beer, CFO of BrightVolt, a battery company in Redmond.

Caption: The scene of a mass raid on the Synagoge the Tree of Life in the neighborhood of Squirrel Hill on October 27, 2018 in Pittsburgh, Penn.

Photo by Jeff Swensen / Getty Images

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