Waymo admits that the human driver was responsible for an accident that had injured a motorcyclist

Waymo admits that the human driver was responsible for an accident that had injured a motorcyclist

A self-driving car that collided with a motorcyclist and was injured was caused by the assistant driver.

Waymo, the autonomous vehicle division of Google parent company Alphabet, announced that the human driver had taken control of the vehicle last month.

After Waymo's simulations after the accident, the car would have slowed down and avoided a collision if left to its own devices.

Waymo has admitted that the fault of the incident lies with the driver and not with his technology.

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Waymo, the autonomous auto division of Google's parent company Alphabet, revealed that the human driver had taken control of the vehicle last month

Waymo, the autonomous car division of Google's parent company Alphabet, revealed that the human driver had taken control of the vehicle last month

The unfortunate incident occurred when the driver felt the need to take control of the Waymo minivan and to flow from the middle lane on the highway into the outside lane.

Another vehicle had got into the lane from the left lane, where the Waymo vehicle was originally located. This forced the cautious driver to take the wheel.

The slow-moving car (21 miles per hour) was then driven into the path of an arriving motorcycle (28 miles per hour), which had already started an overtaking maneuver of the human operator.

The accident occurred on October 19 in El Camino Real, near the headquarters of Waymo Mountain View.

It is believed that the motorcyclist was injured and taken to a hospital.

Every time a person takes over the self-driving white Chrysler Pacifica minivans operated by Waymo, this is recorded as an "incident".

The company then runs software simulations with the data collected from the wealth of sensors and 360 ° cameras of the vehicle to determine how the vehicle would have responded if autonomous mode had not been disabled.

"Our self-propelled system has simultaneously tracked the position, direction and speed of every object in its environment," said John Krafcik, CEO of Waymo, in a blog post.

"Crucially, our technology correctly predicted and predicted the future behavior of both the merging vehicle and the rider."

Waymo is the first of the self-propelled companies to have been allowed to operate in California without human drivers on public roads.

After Waymos simulations after the accident, the car would have slowed down and avoided a collision if left to itself. Waymo has admitted that the fault of the incident lies with the driver and not with his technology

After Waymo's simulations after the accident, the car would have slowed down and avoided a collision if left to its own devices. Waymo has admitted that the fault of the incident lies with the driver and not with his technology

HOW DO WAYMO TEST HIS SELF-LEADING VEHICLES BEFORE TAKING PUBLIC ROADS?

Waymo built Castle, a hidden bogus city that can be quickly configured to test different scenarios.

It is located north of the Merced metro area, where since 2014 the Google Air Force has rented Castle Air Force.

As part of the first two-year lease, the company rented 80 hectares of Merced Country for $ 456,000 and was paid out in monthly installments of $ 19,000.

There are various driving environments, including residential streets, highways, dead ends and parking lots.

Waymo's testing grounds are located north of the Merced metro area, where the Castle Air Force used to be

Waymo's testing grounds are located north of the Merced metro area, where the Castle Air Force used to be

In Castle, the streets are named after famous cars like DeLorean, Bullitt, Thunderbird, Fury and Barbaro.

For structured tests, Waymo explores how self-driving cars behave on real roads to determine how to train. Then they build what is needed in Castle.

The fake city has no buildings but one – a converted military dorm where Waymo employees sleep when they're too tired to return to San Francisco.

It's hidden and you need GPS coordinates to find it.

Castle is located north of Merced subway area, which used to be Castle Air Force Base, 2.5 hours from the company's headquarters. There, Waymo tests various types of self-driving cars, including the minibuses of Chysler Pacificas

Castle is just north of Merced subway area, which used to be Castle Air Force Base, 2.5 hours from the company's headquarters. There, Waymo tests various types of self-driving cars, including the minibuses of Chysler Pacificas

Not long after a self-driving Uber crash, Waymo boss John Krafcik (pictured) said the incident did not happen with his company's technology

Not long after a self-driving Uber accident, John Krafcik, CEO of Waymo (pictured), said the incident did not happen with his company's technology

This incident occurs in the same month that another Waymo vehicle was involved in an accident due to a human driver error.

One of Waymo's self-driving minivans crashed into a median after his only human driver fell asleep at the wheel in June and was announced by The Information.

While driving on a route that Waymo uses to test software for autonomous vehicles, the person who claimed the safety of the personnel seemed to be idling after an hour's drive.

Then the driver has accidentally turned off the autonomous software of the vehicle by touching the accelerator pedal.

The driver did not take the wheel and ignored warnings that the self-propelled software was disabled.

No one was injured in the accident and no other vehicles were involved in the incident.

The driver was able to return the car to Waymo's offices. However, according to the information, he no longer works for Waymo.

Self-driving vehicles were intensively investigated after a self-driving Uber hit and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona in March.

In that case, the Uber's only human driver at the time of the impact radiated The Voice over his phone.

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