Woman, 32, is expecting a miracle baby after being told her scars would prevent it

Woman, 32, is expecting a miracle baby after being told her scars would prevent it

A pregnant woman is expecting a miracle baby – despite instructions from doctors to adopt or accept children who do not have children after a grueling operation.

Sarah Seddon, 32, underwent surgery five times and had life-threatening sepsis 20 times while suffering from Crohn's disease.

Little Coates' medical assistant, Grimsby, was previously pregnant with IVF because she had difficulty receiving in a natural way. Her son was born dead in March of this year.

But Miss Seddon is now pregnant again, although doctors had warned that the fertility treatment would not work for her due to the scars caused by her infections and numerous surgeries.

Sarah Seddon, 32, has had large scars in her abdomen due to numerous operations for Crohn's disease and infections she suffered after surgery. As a result, the doctors said they could not have children

Sarah Seddon, 32, has great scarring in her abdomen due to numerous Crohn's disease operations and infections she suffered after surgery. As a result, the doctors said that she could not have children

Miss Seddon, who has been diagnosed with Crohn's disease since age 11, said, "In 1998, I was diagnosed with Crohn's as my health worsened.

"My mother took me to the hospital when she knew something was wrong and my weight had seriously decreased.

"I've been fighting the disease for 18 years and every treatment I tried did not work.

"I've had some difficult times when it came to a point where I thought they could do nothing for me."

She had five major operations since 2004, beginning with a right hemicolectomy to remove part of her colon.

After her second surgery in November 2013, she developed sepsis for the first time – a deadly complication of another infection.

She described how her mother called Diana for an ambulance when she began to shake uncontrollably as her temperature rose and fever began.

Miss Seddon was sent to Diana, the Princess of Wales Hospital in Grimbsy, where she needed a drain suitable for treating an infection in her surgical wound.

As her health did not improve after the second procedure, Miss Seddon had three more surgeries to remove parts of the damaged bowel.

Miss Seddon and her fiancé Ian Carrick (pictured) expect a healthy baby in May next year after their first child, Vinnie, was born dead in March this year

Miss Seddon and her fiancé Ian Carrick (pictured) expect a healthy baby in May next year after their first child, Vinnie, was born dead in March this year

The new baby (pictured a scan of Miss Seddon's current pregnancy) is the result of the IVF and a couple's track record that opposes the odds after doctors said fertility treatment would not work for them

The new baby (pictured a scan of Miss Seddon's current pregnancy) is the result of the IVF and a couple's track record that defied the odds after doctors said the fertility treatment would not work for them

But within a period of three years between her second and fifth surgery, Ms. Seddon claims she has contracted sepsis another 20 times.

She would get the complication every time she underwent surgery, and her surgical wounds were repeatedly infected, leading repeatedly to sepsis.

"The first time I had this overwhelming fear that it was bad," said Miss Seddon. "But I've always argued with my mother not to call the ambulance and tell her I'm fine.

"I think I was just so scared to know what happened, that I refused, and from then on I got sepsis each time I had an open wound.

"After my third surgery, I even had to have a central line installed that I had been through for eleven weeks.

"Because I worked in the hospital, they told me that a bed was ready when I felt the symptoms of sepsis.

"I always knew when it started, because I stopped eating and got a fever."

Due to the scars left from the operation and drainage tubes inserted into her abdomen, Miss Seddon was told that she could not get the children she always longed for.

When she was asked to pray for IVF after attempting to behave naturally, she was followed by scars around her ovaries, and the fallopian tubes made it too difficult for the paramedics to implant the embryo.

The doctors also said she could not have a caesarean section because of the scars on her stomach, and she might get sepsis again during pregnancy.

Miss Seddon had a broken heart when his first child, Vinnie, was born dead this year, but the couple is determined to have another child (pictured: Vinnie's bedroom)

Miss Seddon had a broken heart when his first child, Vinnie, was still dead this year, but the couple is determined to have another child (pictured: Vinnie's bedroom)

The doctors said the scarring of her surgery would make a natural delivery too risky and she would not get a caesarean section

The doctors said the scarring of her surgery would make a natural delivery too risky and she would not get a caesarean section

Miss Seddon said that she and Mr. Carrick are "so happy, but also a bit afraid of other complications" (pictured holding a babygrow for their newborn with the message "Chosen by Brother Vinnie in Heaven for the Earth")

Miss Seddon said that she and Mr. Carrick are "so happy, but also a bit afraid of other complications" (pictured holding a babygrow for their newborn with the message "Chosen by Brother Vinnie in Heaven for the Earth")

And she and her fiancé Ian Carrick, a 36-year-old auto parts salesman, faced another heartbreak when her son Vinnie was born dead in March after 31 weeks.

Miss Seddon said, "They said that even for me it would be difficult to get IVF, because it would be so difficult for them to get to my tubes because of the scars, and it could be dangerous for me because of the sepsis to carry a baby.

"The doctor told me" accept or accept your options "- it was so dull.

"But we knew that my womb was healthy, even if the environment was not so, and we were determined to get a second opinion."

And the specialist who gave a second opinion said it would be safe for Miss Seddon to have IVF – and now she expects a healthy baby next May.

"I tried to stay as positive as possible and be as normal as possible," she said. "With Vinnie, we had such a broken heart that we lost a baby for so long, so close to full birth.

"We were told that it was not due to my previous health problems, it was just something that could happen to anyone.

"But we knew that if we did not give everything we had now and continue to try IVF, we would never get another chance.

"I did everything the doctors said I could not do that."

The couple even got a babygrow ready for their newborn with the message "Handpicked by Brother Vinnie in Heaven" for Earth.

Ms. Seddon, who received an inspirational Mother's Prize in October of this year, said, "The special recognition award was overwhelming.

"At the moment we are so happy, but also a bit afraid of other complications. We only want to meet our little one. "

WHAT IS SEPSIS?

Sepsis occurs when the body responds to an infection by attacking its own organs and tissues.

Every year, around 44,000 people die of sepsis in the UK. Every 3.5 seconds someone dies worldwide from the condition.

Sepsis has similar symptoms as flu, gastroenteritis and a breast infection.

These include:

  • Sblurred speech or confusion
  • eExtreme tremor or muscle pain
  • PThere is no urine in one day
  • SAlways short of breath
  • IIt feels like you're dying
  • SRelatives spotty or discolored

Symptoms in children are:

  • Fast breathing
  • Fits or cramps
  • Spotty, bluish or pale skin
  • Rashes that do not fade when pressed
  • lethargy
  • Feels unusually cold

Under five years can vomit repeatedly, do not feed or urinate for 12 hours.

Anyone can develop sepsis, but it is most common in patients who have undergone recent surgery, a urinary catheter, or a long hospital stay.

Other vulnerable persons are those with weakened immune systems, chemotherapy patients, pregnant women, the elderly and very young people.

The treatment varies depending on the site of infection but may require antibiotics, infusions and oxygen.

Source: UK Sepsis Trust and NHS Choices

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