Find a billion dollars! Exotic bird with a 3D printed beak in lifesaving operation

Find a billion dollars! Exotic bird with a 3D printed beak in lifesaving operation

An exotic bird was endowed with a 3D printed beak after being plagued by cancer.

The staff at Jurong Bird Park noticed that the animal had an 8cm cut on its bill and the cancerous beak known as Casque was removed.

Two birds had already died of the condition, so veterinarians decided to give 22-year-old Jary, a large rat-horn bird, a tailor-made alternative.

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Jary, a 22-year-old Great Pied Hornbill, was provided with a 3D-printed beak after his own cancer (pictured)

Jary, a 22-year-old Great Pied Hornbill, was provided with a 3D-printed beak after his own cancer (pictured)

For life-saving operations, engineers and veterinarians had to work together on the procedure.

Pictures and videos of the operation show Jary doing several scans and screwing the new beak.

Analysis of the old beak confirmed that the malformation was due to cancer.

The bird was named Jary because it means "Helmed Warrior" in the Old Norse language.

The 46-gram prosthesis was installed during a hours-long operation at a specialized facility in Singapore, and the operating physicians discovered that this was a complete success.

Dr. Xie Shangzhe, deputy director, Preservation, Research and Veterinary Services of Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: "This case is a prime example of how veterinarians and engineers can work together to bring science and technology to treat diseases like cancer To use species, including birds.

"Together we have achieved the best possible result.

Jary ate normal the day after the operation and recently also rubbed the prosthetic box on his glands, eliminating yellow pigment.

"These natural behaviors are a good indication that he has accepted the prosthesis as part of him."

The workers of Jurong Bird Park noticed that the animal had an 8 cm long cut on its bill and the cancerous beak - known as Casque - was removed (pictured).

The workers of Jurong Bird Park noticed that the animal had an 8 cm long cut on its bill and the cancerous beak – known as Casque – was removed (pictured).

The bird (pictured) was named Jary because it means "Helmed Warrior" in the Old Norse language

The bird (pictured) was named Jary because it means "Helmed Warrior" in the Old Norse language

For life-saving operations, engineers and veterinarians had to work together to successfully complete the process

For life-saving operations, engineers and veterinarians had to work together to successfully complete the process

Pictures and videos of the operation show Jary doing several scans and screwing the new beak into placecon

Pictures and videos of the operation show Jary doing several scans and screwing the new beak into placecon

The analysis of the beak confirmed that the malformation was a result of cancer and Jary's case had to be removed to save his life

The analysis of the beak confirmed that the malformation was a result of cancer and Jary's case had to be removed to save his life

Two hornbills in the park died of cancer. One was treated unsuccessfully with chemotherapy and the other animal had an aggressive form of cancer that had progressed too fast for treatment

The Guardians noticed a cut on Jary's beak, which showed that the tissue below was "eaten away" by the disease.

The bird underwent a CT-guided biopsy at the Veterinary Emergency and Specialty Hospital and a tissue sample was taken.

Dr. Hsu Li Chieh removed Jarys Kasque with an oscillating saw (picture) to set up the prosthesis

Dr. Hsu Li Chieh removed Jarys Kasque with an oscillating saw (picture) to set up the prosthesis

Dr. Xie Shangzhe, deputy director, Preservation, Research and Veterinary Services of Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: "This case is a prime example of how veterinarians and engineers can work together to bring science and technology to treat diseases like cancer To use species, including birds

Dr. Xie Shangzhe, deputy director, Preservation, Research and Veterinary Services of Wildlife Reserves Singapore, said: "This case is a prime example of how veterinarians and engineers can work together to bring science and technology to treat diseases like cancer To use species, including birds

Jary ate normal the day after the operation and recently also rubbed the prosthetic box on his glands, eliminating yellow pigment

Jary ate normal the day after the operation and recently also rubbed the prosthetic box on his glands, eliminating yellow pigment

Dental resin was applied to the new housing to fill in gaps and increase the likelihood that Jary would accept his new beak

Dental resin was applied to the new housing to fill in gaps and increase the likelihood that Jary would accept his new beak

WHAT IS 3D PRINTING AND HOW DOES IT WORK?

Invented in the 1980s by Chuck Hull, an engineer and physicist, 3D printing technology – also known as additive manufacturing – is the process of making an object by depositing material, layer by layer.

Similar to adding ink dots to an inkjet printer to create an image, a 3D printer adds material at the desired location based on a digital file.

Many conventional manufacturing processes involved cutting away excess materials to make one part, and this can result in a loss of up to 13.6 kilograms for each pound of useful material.

In contrast, in some 3D printing processes, about 98 percent of the raw material is used in the finished part, and the process can be used to make small components from plastics and metal powders, with some experiments experimenting with chocolate and other foods as biomaterials similar to human cells.

3D printers were used to make dentures and even robots. The process follows these basic steps:

· Create a 3D blueprint with computer-aided design software (CAD)

· Prepare the printer, including refilling the starting materials such as plastics, metal powders, and bonding solutions.

· Initiate printing from the machine that creates the object.

· 3D printing processes can vary, but material extrusion is the most common and works like a glue gun: the print material is heated until it liquefies and is extruded through the print nozzle

· Information from the digital file divides the design into two-dimensional cross-sections so that the printers know where to place the material

· The nozzle deposits the polymer in thin layers, often 0.1 millimeter (0.004 inch) thick.

· The polymer quickly solidifies and bonds to the underlying layer before the build platform lowers, and the printhead adds another layer (depending on the object, the entire process can take a few minutes to days).

· After the printing process is completed, each object must be reworked. This ranges from detaching the object from the build platform, removing the support, to removing excess powder.

The patient is now closely monitored and closely monitored at the outstation of Avian Hospital at Jurong Bird Park.

Jary's prosthetics will stay in place until he manages to build his own housing.

Great Pied Hornbills are classified as "near threat" in the Red List of Endangered Species of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

The Great Hornbill is native to the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia and known for its impressive size and color.

Animals can live very long, some live in captivity for almost 50 years.

The Jurong Bird Park currently houses four male and six female Great Pied Hornbills, who live on average for 40 years.

Jary is now being closely monitored and is being closely watched in the outstation of Avian Hospital at Jurong Bird Park

Jary is now being closely monitored and is being closely watched in the outstation of Avian Hospital at Jurong Bird Park

Jary's prosthetics will stay in place until he manages to build his own housing. Great Pied Hornbills are classified as "endangered" in the Red List of Endangered Species of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature

Jary's prosthetics will stay in place until he manages to build his own housing. Great Pied Hornbills are classified as "near threat" in the Red List of Endangered Species of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature

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