Parkinson's disease could start in this part of the body, according to a massive study

Parkinson's disease could start in this part of the body, according to a massive study
<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Scientists have understood the symptoms of Parkinson's disease for some time Diseases develop when dopamine-producing brain cells begin to die, and dopamine is a chemical messenger that helps regulate movement, and Parkinson's with decreasing levels of reflection Not is understood Why These cells begin to collapse – but a huge new study sheds light on it. "data-reactid =" 22 "> Scientists have understood for a while that symptoms of Parkinson's disease develop when dopamine-producing brain cells begin to die: dopamine is a chemical messenger that helps to regulate movement, and dives with decreasing levels Parkinson on Not is understood Why These cells begin to break – but a huge new study casts light.

<p class = "Canvas Atom Canvas Text Mb (1.0em) MB (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Researchers scoured the records of more than 1.6 million patients some of whom were already 52 years old: Parkinson's could affect the muscles, but the researchers suspect that the intestine is showing the first signs.In this massive study, the scientists focused on the appendix, which is attached to the large intestine Results in the journal Science Translational Medicine suggest that the organ plays a major role in the development of the disease. Find out about 21 health secrets your belly is trying to tell you. "Data-reactid =" 23 "> The researchers scoured the records of more than 1.6 million patients, some of whom were already 52. ​​They may think that Parkinson's affects the disease muscles, but researchers suggest that Intestine shows the first signs In this massive study, the scientists focused on the cecum, which is connected to the colon Science Translational Medicine suggest that the organ plays a major role in the development of the disease. Learn about 21 health secrets your belly is trying to tell you.

People whose cecum had been removed at an early stage, according to the results, a 19 percent lower risk of Parkinson's disease. In rural areas where Parkinson's is more prevalent, the effect was even greater: People with appendectomies were 25 percent less likely to receive a diagnosis.

The removal of attachments can not completely prevent or stop the disease, but those who developed Parkinson's after losing their attachment have postponed the diagnosis by more than three years. However, removing the attachment after the onset of symptoms did not appear to provide protection. In addition, the researchers found in attachments markings of Lewy bodies that represent abnormal clumps of a protein called alpha-synuclein. Lewy bodies in the brain are a hallmark of Parkinson's, but interestingly, even healthy people had the proteins in their attachments. Look at more unresolved secrets about the human body.

"Parkinson's is relatively rare – less than 1 percent of the population – so there must be a different mechanism or confluence of events that allows the appendix to influence the Parkinson's risk," said Viviane Labrie, a Ph.D. Press release. "What we want to look at next: Which factor or factors speak for Parkinson's?" Whether your attachment is intact or not, pay attention to these early symptoms of Parkinson's disease, which can easily be overlooked.

Source: EurekAlert!

Leave a comment

Send a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.